International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Jonathan Katz

Affiliation: University of Maryland

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
CRYPTO
2019
EUROCRYPT
Covert Security with Public Verifiability: Faster, Leaner, and Simpler
The notion of covert security for secure two-party computation serves as a compromise between the traditional semi-honest and malicious security definitions. Roughly, covert security ensures that cheating behavior is detected by the honest party with reasonable probability (say, 1/2). It provides more realistic guarantees than semi-honest security with significantly less overhead than is required by malicious security.The rationale for covert security is that it dissuades cheating by parties that care about their reputation and do not want to risk being caught. But a much stronger disincentive is obtained if the honest party can generate a publicly verifiable certificate when cheating is detected. While the corresponding notion of publicly verifiable covert (PVC) security has been explored, existing PVC protocols are complex and less efficient than the best covert protocols, and have impractically large certificates.We propose a novel PVC protocol that significantly improves on prior work. Our protocol uses only “off-the-shelf” primitives (in particular, it avoids signed oblivious transfer) and, for deterrence factor 1/2, has only 20–40% overhead compared to state-of-the-art semi-honest protocols. Our protocol also has, for the first time, constant-size certificates of cheating (e.g., 354 bytes long at the 128-bit security level).As our protocol offers strong security guarantees with low overhead, we suggest that it is the best choice for many practical applications of secure two-party computation.
2019
JOFC
(Efficient) Universally Composable Oblivious Transfer Using a Minimal Number of Stateless Tokens
We continue the line of work initiated by Katz (Eurocrypt 2007) on using tamper-proof hardware tokens for universally composable secure computation. As our main result, we show an oblivious-transfer (OT) protocol in which two parties each create and transfer a single, stateless token and can then run an unbounded number of OTs. We also show a more efficient protocol, based only on standard symmetric-key primitives (block ciphers and collision-resistant hash functions), that can be used if a bounded number of OTs suffice. Motivated by this result, we investigate the number of stateless tokens needed for universally composable OT. We prove that our protocol is optimal in this regard for constructions making black-box use of the tokens (in a sense we define). We also show that nonblack-box techniques can be used to obtain a construction using only a single stateless token.
2018
CRYPTO
Optimizing Authenticated Garbling for Faster Secure Two-Party Computation 📺
Wang et al. (CCS 2017) recently proposed a protocol for malicious secure two-party computation that represents the state-of-the-art with regard to concrete efficiency in both the single-execution and amortized settings, with or without preprocessing. We show here several optimizations of their protocol that result in a significant improvement in the overall communication and running time. Specifically:We show how to make the “authenticated garbling” at the heart of their protocol compatible with the half-gate optimization of Zahur et al. (Eurocrypt 2015). We also show how to avoid sending an information-theoretic MAC for each garbled row. These two optimizations give up to a 2.6$$\times $$× improvement in communication, and make the communication of the online phase essentially equivalent to that of state-of-the-art semi-honest secure computation.We show various optimizations to their protocol for generating AND triples that, overall, result in a 1.5$$\times $$× improvement in the communication and a 2$$\times $$× improvement in the computation for that step.
2018
CRYPTO
Provable Security of (Tweakable) Block Ciphers Based on Substitution-Permutation Networks 📺
Substitution-Permutation Networks (SPNs) refer to a family of constructions which build a wn-bit block cipher from n-bit public permutations (often called S-boxes), which alternate keyless and “local” substitution steps utilizing such S-boxes, with keyed and “global” permutation steps which are non-cryptographic. Many widely deployed block ciphers are constructed based on the SPNs, but there are essentially no provable-security results about SPNs.In this work, we initiate a comprehensive study of the provable security of SPNs as (possibly tweakable) wn-bit block ciphers, when the underlying n-bit permutation is modeled as a public random permutation. When the permutation step is linear (which is the case for most existing designs), we show that 3 SPN rounds are necessary and sufficient for security. On the other hand, even 1-round SPNs can be secure when non-linearity is allowed. Moreover, 2-round non-linear SPNs can achieve “beyond-birthday” (up to $$2^{2n/3}$$ 22n/3 adversarial queries) security, and, as the number of non-linear rounds increases, our bounds are meaningful for the number of queries approaching $$2^n$$ 2n. Finally, our non-linear SPNs can be made tweakable by incorporating the tweak into the permutation layer, and provide good multi-user security.As an application, our construction can turn two public n-bit permutations (or fixed-key block ciphers) into a tweakable block cipher working on wn-bit inputs, 6n-bit key and an n-bit tweak (for any $$w\ge 2$$ w≥2); the tweakable block cipher provides security up to $$2^{2n/3}$$ 22n/3 adversarial queries in the random permutation model, while only requiring w calls to each permutation, and 3w field multiplications for each wn-bit input.
2018
ASIACRYPT
Simple and Efficient Two-Server ORAM
S. Dov Gordon Jonathan Katz Xiao Wang
We show a protocol for two-server oblivious RAM (ORAM) that is simpler and more efficient than the best prior work. Our construction combines any tree-based ORAM with an extension of a two-server private information retrieval scheme by Boyle et al., and is able to avoid recursion and thus use only one round of interaction. In addition, our scheme has a very cheap initialization phase, making it well suited for RAM-based secure computation. Although our scheme requires the servers to perform a linear scan over the entire data, the cryptographic computation involved consists only of block-cipher evaluations.A practical instantiation of our protocol has excellent concrete parameters: for storing an N-element array of arbitrary size data blocks with statistical security parameter $$\lambda $$, the servers each store 4N encrypted blocks, the client stores $$\lambda +2\log N$$ blocks, and the total communication per logical access is roughly $$10 \log N$$ encrypted blocks.
2018
ASIACRYPT
More is Less: Perfectly Secure Oblivious Algorithms in the Multi-server Setting
The problem of Oblivious RAM (ORAM) has traditionally been studied in the single-server setting, but more recently the multi-server setting has also been considered. Yet it is still unclear whether the multi-server setting has any inherent advantages, e.g., whether the multi-server setting can be used to achieve stronger security goals or provably better efficiency than is possible in the single-server case.In this work, we construct a perfectly secure 3-server ORAM scheme that outperforms the best known single-server scheme by a logarithmic factor. In the process we also show, for the first time, that there exist specific algorithms for which multiple servers can overcome known lower bounds in the single-server setting.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
EUROCRYPT
2016
EUROCRYPT
2016
ASIACRYPT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
TCC
2015
TCC
2014
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
EUROCRYPT
2014
PKC
2014
TCC
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2013
PKC
2013
PKC
2013
TCC
2013
TCC
2013
TCC
2013
CRYPTO
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
JOFC
Round-Optimal Password-Based Authenticated Key Exchange
Jonathan Katz Vinod Vaikuntanathan
We show a general framework for constructing password-based authenticated key-exchange protocols with optimal round complexity—one message per party, sent simultaneously—in the standard model, assuming the existence of a common reference string. When our framework is instantiated using bilinear-map-based cryptosystems, the resulting protocol is also (reasonably) efficient. Somewhat surprisingly, our framework can be adapted to give protocols in the standard model that are universally composable while still using only one (simultaneous) round.
2012
TCC
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
CRYPTO
2012
PKC
2011
TCC
2011
TCC
2011
TCC
2011
TCC
2011
ASIACRYPT
2010
TCC
2010
EPRINT
One-Round Password-Based Authenticated Key Exchange
Jonathan Katz Vinod Vaikuntanathan
We show a general framework for constructing password-based authenticated key exchange protocols with optimal round complexity --- one message per party, sent simultaneously --- in the standard model, assuming the existence of a common reference string. When our framework is instantiated using bilinear-map cryptosystems, the resulting protocol is also (reasonably) efficient. Somewhat surprisingly, our framework can be adapted to give protocols (still in the standard model) that are universally composable, while still using only one (simultaneous) round.
2010
PKC
2010
JOFC
2010
ASIACRYPT
2010
EUROCRYPT
2010
EPRINT
On Achieving the "Best of Both Worlds" in Secure Multiparty Computation
Two settings are traditionally considered for secure multiparty computation, depending on whether or not a majority of the parties are assumed to be honest. Protocols designed under this assumption provide ``full security'' (and, in particular, guarantee output delivery and fairness) when this assumption holds; unfortunately, these protocols are completely insecure if this assumption is violated. On the other hand, protocols tolerating an arbitrary number of corruptions do not guarantee fairness or output delivery even if only a \emph{single} party is dishonest. It is natural to wonder whether it is possible to achieve the ``best of both worlds'': namely, a single protocol that simultaneously achieves the best possible security in both the above settings. Here, we rule out this possibility (at least for general functionalities) but show some positive results regarding what \emph{can} be achieved.
2010
EPRINT
A New Framework for Password-Based Authenticated Key Exchange
Adam Groce Jonathan Katz
Protocols for password-based authenticated key exchange (PAKE) allow two users who share only a short, low-entropy password to agree on a cryptographically strong session key. The challenge in designing such protocols is that they must be immune to off-line dictionary attacks in which an eavesdropping adversary exhaustively enumerates the dictionary of likely passwords in an attempt to match a password to the set of observed transcripts. To date, few general frameworks for constructing PAKE protocols in the standard model are known. Here, we abstract and generalize a protocol by Jiang and Gong to give a new methodology for realizing PAKE without random oracles, in the common reference string model. In addition to giving a new approach to the problem, the resulting construction offers several advantages over prior work. We also describe an extension of our protocol that is secure within the universal composability~(UC) framework and, when instantiated using El Gamal encryption, is more efficient than a previous protocol of Canetti et al.
2010
EPRINT
Cryptography Resilient to Continual Memory Leakage
In recent years, there has been a major effort to design cryptographic schemes that remain secure even if part of the secret key is leaked. This is due to a recent proliferation of side channel attacks which, through various physical means, can recover part of the secret key. We explore the possibility of achieving security even with continual leakage, i.e., even if some information is leaked each time the key is used. We show how to securely update a secret key while information is leaked: We construct schemes that remain secure even if an attacker, {\em at each time period}, can probe the entire memory (containing a secret key) and ``leak'' up to a $(1-o(1))$ fraction of the secret key. The attacker may also probe the memory during the updates, and leak $O(\log k)$ bits, where $k$ is the security parameter (relying on subexponential hardness allows $k^\epsilon$ bits of leakage during each update process). All of the above is achieved without restricting the model as is done in previous works (e.g. by assuming that ``only computation leaks information'' [Micali-Reyzin, TCC04]). Specifically, under the decisional linear assumption on bilinear groups (which allows for a leakage rate of $(1/2-o(1))$) or the symmetric external Diffie-Hellman assumption (which allows for a leakage rate of $(1-o(1))$), we achieve the above for public key encryption, identity-based encryption, and signature schemes. Prior to this work, it was not known how to construct public-key encryption schemes even in the more restricted model of [MR]. The main contributions of this work are (1) showing how to securely update a secret key while information is leaked (in the more general model) and (2) giving a public key encryption (and IBE) schemes that are resilient to continual leakage.
2010
EPRINT
Robust Fuzzy Extractors and Authenticated Key Agreement from Close Secrets
Consider two parties holding samples from correlated distributions W and W', respectively, that are within distance t of each other in some metric space. These parties wish to agree on a uniformly distributed secret key R by sending a single message over an insecure channel controlled by an all-powerful adversary. We consider both the keyless case, where the parties share no additional secret information, and the keyed case, where the parties share a long-term secret SK that they can use to generate a sequence of session keys {R_j} using multiple pairs {W_j, W'_j}. The former has applications to, e.g., biometric authentication, while the latter arises in, e.g., the bounded storage model with errors. Our results improve upon previous work in several respects: -- The best previous solution for the keyless case with no errors (i.e., t=0) requires the min-entropy of W to exceed 2n/3, where n is the bit-length of W. Our solution applies whenever min-entropy of W exceeds the minimal possible} threshold n/2, and yields a longer key. -- Previous solutions for the keyless case in the presence of errors (i.e., t>0) required random oracles. We give the first constructions (for certain metrics) in the standard model. -- Previous solutions for the keyed case were stateful. We give the first stateless solution.
2009
TCC
2009
TCC
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
PKC
2009
JOFC
2009
JOFC
2009
CRYPTO
2009
EPRINT
Attacking Cryptographic Schemes Based on "Perturbation Polynomials"
We show attacks on several cryptographic schemes that have recently been proposed for achieving various security goals in sensor networks. Roughly speaking, these schemes all use "perturbation polynomials" to add "noise" to polynomial-based systems that offer information-theoretic security, in an attempt to increase the resilience threshold while maintaining efficiency. We show that the heuristic security arguments given for these modified schemes do not hold, and that they can be completely broken once we allow even a slight extension of the parameters beyond those achieved by the underlying information-theoretic schemes. Our attacks apply to the key predistribution scheme of Zhang et al. (MobiHoc~2007), the access-control schemes of Subramanian et al. (PerCom~2007), and the authentication schemes of Zhang et~al. (INFOCOM~2008).
2008
TCC
2008
TCC
2008
TCC
2008
EUROCRYPT
2008
FSE
2008
EPRINT
Efficient Rational Secret Sharing in the Standard Communication Model
We propose a new methodology for rational secret sharing leading to various instantiations that are simple and efficient in terms of computation, share size, and round complexity. Our protocols do not require physical assumptions or simultaneous channels, and can even be run over asynchronous, point-to-point networks. Of additional interest, we propose new equilibrium notions for this setting (namely, computational versions of strict Nash equilibrium and stability with respect to trembles), show relations between them, and prove that our protocols satisfy them.
2008
JOFC
2008
EPRINT
Partial Fairness in Secure Two-Party Computation
Dov Gordon Jonathan Katz
Complete fairness is impossible to achieve, in general, in secure two-party computation. In light of this, various techniques for obtaining \emph{partial} fairness in this setting have been suggested. We explore the possibility of achieving partial fairness with respect to a strong, simulation-based definition of security within the standard real/ideal world paradigm. We show feasibility with respect to this definition for randomized functionalities where each player may possibly receive a different output, as long as at least one of the domains or ranges of the functionality are polynomial in size. When one of the domains is polynomial size, our protocol is also secure-with-abort. In contrast to much of the earlier work on partial fairness, we rely on standard assumptions only (namely, enhanced trapdoor permutations). We also provide evidence that our results are, in general, optimal. Specifically, we show a boolean function defined on a domain of super-polynomial size for which it is impossible to achieve both partial fairness and security with abort, and provide evidence that partial fairness is impossible altogether for functions whose domains and ranges all have super-polynomial size.
2008
EPRINT
Complete Fairness in Secure Two-Party Computation
In the setting of secure two-party computation, two mutually distrusting parties wish to compute some function of their inputs while preserving, to the extent possible, security properties such as privacy, correctness, and more. One desirable property is fairness which guarantees, informally, that if one party receives its output, then the other party does too. Cleve (STOC 1986) showed that complete fairness cannot be achieved, in general, without an honest majority. Since then, the accepted folklore has been that nothing non-trivial can be computed with complete fairness in the two-party setting, and the problem has been treated as closed since the late '80s. In this paper, we demonstrate that this folklore belief is false by showing completely-fair protocols for various non-trivial functions in the two-party setting based on standard cryptographic assumptions. We first show feasibility of obtaining complete fairness when computing any function over polynomial-size domains that does not contain an ``embedded XOR''; this class of functions includes boolean AND/OR as well as Yao's ``millionaires' problem''. We also demonstrate feasibility for certain functions that do contain an embedded XOR, and prove a lower bound showing that any completely-fair protocol for such functions must have round complexity super-logarithmic in the security parameter. Our results demonstrate that the question of completely-fair secure computation without an honest majority is far from closed.
2008
EPRINT
Compact Signatures for Network Coding
Jonathan Katz Brent Waters
Network coding offers increased throughput and improved robustness to random faults in completely decentralized networks. Since it does not require centralized control, network coding has been suggested for routing packets in ad-hoc networks, for content distribution in P2P file systems, and for improving the efficiency of large-scale data dissemination over the Internet. In contrast to traditional routing schemes, however, network coding requires intermediate nodes to process and modify data packets en route. For this reason, standard signature schemes are inapplicable and it is therefore a challenge to provide resilience to tampering by malicious nodes in the network. Here, we propose a novel homomorphic signature scheme that can be used in conjunction with network coding to prevent malicious modification of data. The overhead of our scheme is small and independent of the file or packet size: both public keys and signatures in our scheme consist of only a single group element.
2008
TCC
2008
EPRINT
Collusion-Free Multiparty Computation in the Mediated Model
Jonathan Katz Yehuda Lindell
Collusion-free protocols prevent subliminal communication (i.e., covert channels) between parties running the protocol. In the standard communication model (and assuming the existence of one-way functions), protocols satisfying any reasonable degree of privacy cannot be collusion-free. To circumvent this impossibility result, Alwen et al. recently suggested the mediated model where all communication passes through a mediator; the goal is to design protocols where collusion-freeness is guaranteed as long as the mediator is honest, while standard security guarantees continue to hold if the mediator is dishonest. In this model, they gave constructions of collusion-free protocols for commitments and zero-knowledge proofs in the two-party setting. We strengthen the definition of Alwen et al. in several ways, and resolve the key open questions in this area by showing a collusion-free protocol (in the mediated model) for computing any multi-party functionality.
2008
EPRINT
Signing a Linear Subspace: Signature Schemes for Network Coding
Network coding offers increased throughput and improved robustness to random faults in completely decentralized networks. In contrast to traditional routing schemes, however, network coding requires intermediate nodes to modify data packets en route; for this reason, standard signature schemes are inapplicable and it is a challenge to provide resilience to tampering by malicious nodes. Here, we propose two signature schemes that can be used in conjunction with network coding to prevent malicious modification of data. In particular, our schemes can be viewed as signing linear subspaces in the sense that a signature on V authenticates exactly those vectors in V. Our first scheme is homomorphic and has better performance, with both public key size and per-packet overhead being constant. Our second scheme does not rely on random oracles and uses weaker assumptions. We also prove a lower bound on the length of signatures for linear subspaces showing that both of our schemes are essentially optimal in this regard.
2007
CRYPTO
2007
EUROCRYPT
2007
EUROCRYPT
2007
TCC
2007
EPRINT
Which Languages Have 4-Round Zero-Knowledge Proofs?
Jonathan Katz
We show, unconditionally, that if a language $L$ has a 4-round, black-box, computational zero-knowledge proof system with negligible soundness error, then $\bar L \in MA$. Assuming the polynomial hierarchy does not collapse, this means, in particular, that $NP$-complete languages do not have 4-round zero-knowledge proofs (at least with respect to black-box simulation).
2007
JOFC
2007
JOFC
2007
EPRINT
Improving the Round Complexity of 'Round-Optimal' VSS
We revisit the following question: what is the optimal round complexity of verifiable secret sharing~(VSS)? We focus here on the case of perfectly-secure VSS where the number of corrupted parties $t$ satisfies $t < n/3$, with $n$ being the total number of parties. Work of Gennaro et al. (STOC~2001) and Fitzi et al. (TCC~2006) shows that, assuming a broadcast channel, 3~rounds are necessary and sufficient for efficient VSS. The efficient 3-round protocol of Fitzi et al., however, treats the broadcast channel as being available ``for free'' and does not attempt to minimize its usage. As argued previously by the authors, this approach leads to poor round complexity when protocols are compiled for a point-to-point network. We show here a VSS protocol that is simultaneously optimal in terms of both the number of rounds and the number of invocations of broadcast. Our protocol also has a certain ``2-level sharing'' property that makes it useful for constructing protocols for general secure computation.
2007
EPRINT
Universally Composable Multi-Party Computation with an Unreliable Common Reference String
Vipul Goyal Jonathan Katz
Universally composable multi-party computation has been studied in two settings: \begin{itemize} \item When a majority of participants are honest, universally composable multi-party computation is known to be possible without any assumptions. \item When honest participants are \emph{not} in the majority, universally composable multi-party computation is known to be impossible (under any cryptographic assumption) in the bare model. On the other hand, feasibility results have been obtained (under standard cryptographic assumptions) in various augmented models, the most popular of which posits the existence of a \emph{common references string} (CRS) available to all parties who are executing the protocol. \end{itemize} In either of the above settings, some \emph{assumption} regarding the protocol execution is made (i.e., that many parties are honest in the first case, or that a legitimately-chosen string is available in the second), and if this assumption is incorrect then all security is lost. A natural question is whether it is possible to design protocols giving \emph{some} assurance of security in case \emph{either one} of these assumptions holds, i.e., a single protocol (that uses a CRS) which is secure if \emph{either} at most $s$ players are dishonest \emph{or} if up to $t$ players are dishonest (with $t > s$) but the CRS is chosen in the proscribed manner. We show that such protocols exist if and only if $s+t < n$.
2007
EPRINT
Predicate Encryption Supporting Disjunctions, Polynomial Equations, and Inner Products
Jonathan Katz Amit Sahai Brent Waters
Predicate encryption is a new paradigm generalizing, among other things, identity-based encryption. In a predicate encryption scheme, secret keys correspond to predicates and ciphertexts are associated with attributes; the secret key SK_f corresponding to the predicate f can be used to decrypt a ciphertext associated with attribute I if and only if f(I)=1. Constructions of such schemes are currently known for relatively few classes of predicates. We construct such a scheme for predicates corresponding to the evaluation of inner products over N (for some large integer N). This, in turn, enables constructions in which predicates correspond to the evaluation of disjunctions, polynomials, CNF/DNF formulae, or threshold predicates (among others). Besides serving as what we feel is a significant step forward in the theory of predicate encryption, our results lead to a number of applications that are interesting in their own right.
2006
CRYPTO
2006
CRYPTO
2006
EUROCRYPT
2006
TCC
2006
JOFC
2006
EPRINT
Analyzing the HB and HB+ Protocols in the ``Large Error'' Case
Jonathan Katz Adam Smith
HB and HB+ are two shared-key, unidirectional authentication protocols whose extremely low computational cost makes them potentially well-suited for severely resource-constrained devices. Security of these protocols is based on the conjectured hardness of learning parity with noise; that is, learning a secret $s$ given ``noisy'' dot products of $s$ that are incorrect with probability $\epsilon$. Although the problem of learning parity with noise is meaningful for any constant $\epsilon < 1/2$, existing proofs of security for HB and HB+ only imply security when $\epsilon < 1/4$. In this note, we show how to extend these proofs to the case of arbitrary $\epsilon < 1/2$.
2006
EPRINT
On Expected Constant-Round Protocols for Byzantine Agreement
Jonathan Katz Chiu-Yuen Koo
In a seminal paper, Feldman and Micali (STOC '88) show an $n$-party Byzantine agreement protocol tolerating $t < n/3$ malicious parties that runs in expected constant rounds. Here, we show an expected constant-round protocol for authenticated Byzantine agreement assuming honest majority (i.e., $t < n/2$), and relying only on the existence of a secure signature scheme and a public-key infrastructure (PKI). Combined with existing results, this gives the first expected constant-round protocol for secure computation with honest majority in a point-to-point network assuming only one-way functions and a PKI. Our key technical tool --- a new primitive we introduce called moderated VSS --- also yields a simpler proof of the Feldman-Micali result. We also show a simple technique for sequential composition of protocols without simultaneous termination (something that is inherent for Byzantine agreement protocols using $o(n)$ rounds) for the case of $t<n/2$.
2006
EPRINT
Rational Secret Sharing, Revisited
S. Dov Gordon Jonathan Katz
We consider the problem of secret sharing among $n$ rational players. This problem was introduced by Halpern and Teague (STOC 2004), who claim that a solution is impossible for $n=2$ but show a solution for the case $n\geq 3$. Contrary to their claim, we show a protocol for rational secret sharing among $n=2$ players; our protocol extends to the case $n\geq 3$, where it is simpler than the Halpern-Teague solution and also offers a number of other advantages. We also show how to avoid the continual involvement of the dealer, in either our own protocol or that of Halpern and Teague. Our techniques extend to the case of rational players trying to securely compute an arbitrary function, under certain assumptions on the utilities of the players.
2006
EPRINT
On Achieving the ''Best of Both Worlds'' in Secure Multiparty Computation
Jonathan Katz
Two settings are typically considered for secure multiparty computation, depending on whether or not a majority of the parties are assumed to be honest. Protocols designed under this assumption provide full security (and, in particular, guarantee output delivery and fairness) when this assumption is correct; however, if half or more of the parties are dishonest then security is completely compromised. On the other hand, protocols tolerating arbitrarily-many faults do not provide fairness or guaranteed output delivery even if only a single party is dishonest. It is natural to wonder whether it is possible to achieve the ''best of both worlds''; namely, a single protocol that simultaneously achieves the best possible security in both the above settings. Ishai, et al. (Crypto 2006) recently addressed this question, and ruled out constant-round protocols of this type. As our main result, we completely settle the question by ruling out protocols using any (expected) polynomial number of rounds. Given this stark negative result, we ask what can be achieved if we are willing to assume simultaneous message transmission (or, equivalently, a non-rushing adversary). In this setting, we show that impossibility still holds for logarithmic-round protocols. We also show, for any polynomial $p$, a protocol (whose round complexity depends on $p$) that can be simulated to within closeness $O(1/p)$.
2005
EUROCRYPT
2005
EUROCRYPT
2005
EUROCRYPT
2005
TCC
2005
TCC
2005
TCC
2005
EPRINT
Modeling Insider Attacks on Group Key-Exchange Protocols
Jonathan Katz Ji Sun Shin
Protocols for authenticated key exchange (AKE) allow parties within an insecure network to establish a common session key which can then be used to secure their future communication. It is fair to say that group AKE is currently less well understood than the case of two-party AKE; in particular, attacks by malicious insiders --- a concern specific to the group setting --- have so far been considered only in a relatively ``ad-hoc'' fashion. The main contribution of this work is to address this deficiency by providing a formal, comprehensive model and definition of security for group AKE which automatically encompasses insider attacks. We do so by defining an appropriate ideal functionality for group AKE within the universal composability (UC) framework. As a side benefit, any protocol secure with respect to our definition is secure even when run concurrently with other protocols, and the key generated by any such protocol may be used securely in any subsequent application. In addition to proposing this definition, we show that the resulting notion of security is strictly stronger than the one proposed by Bresson, et al. (termed ``AKE-security''), and that our definition implies all previously-suggested notions of security against insider attacks. We also show a simple technique for converting any AKE-secure protocol into one secure with respect to our definition.
2005
EPRINT
Universally Composable Password-Based Key Exchange
We propose and realize a definition of security for password-based key exchange within the framework of universal composability (UC), thus providing security guarantees under arbitrary composition with other protocols. In addition, our definition captures some aspects of the problem that were not adequately addressed by most prior notions. For instance, our definition does not assume any underlying probability distribution on passwords, nor does it assume independence between passwords chosen by different parties. We also formulate a definition of password-based secure channels, and show how to realize such channels given any password-based key exchange protocol. The password-based key exchange protocol shown here is in the common reference string model and relies on standard number-theoretic assumptions. The components of our protocol can be instantiated to give a relatively efficient solution which is conceivably usable in practice. We also show that it is impossible to satisfy our definition in the "plain" model (e.g., without a common reference string).
2005
EPRINT
Ring Signatures: Stronger Definitions, and Constructions without Random Oracles
Ring signatures, first introduced by Rivest, Shamir, and Tauman, enable a user to sign a message so that a ring of possible signers (of which the user is a member) is identified, without revealing exactly which member of that ring actually generated the signature. In contrast to group signatures, ring signatures are completely ``ad-hoc'' and do not require any central authority or coordination among the various users (indeed, users do not even need to be aware of each other); furthermore, ring signature schemes grant users fine-grained control over the level of anonymity associated with any particular signature. This paper has two main areas of focus. First, we examine previous definitions of security for ring signature schemes and suggest that most of these prior definitions are too weak, in the sense that they do not take into account certain realistic attacks. We propose new definitions of anonymity and unforgeability which address these threats, and give separation results proving that our new notions are strictly stronger than previous ones. Second, we show the first constructions of ring signature schemes in the standard model. One scheme is based on generic assumptions and satisfies our strongest definitions of security. Two additional schemes are more efficient, but achieve weaker security guarantees and more limited functionality.
2005
EPRINT
On Constructing Universal One-Way Hash Functions from Arbitrary One-Way Functions
Jonathan Katz Chiu-Yuen Koo
A fundamental result in cryptography is that a digital signature scheme can be constructed from an arbitrary one-way function. A proof of this somewhat surprising statement follows from two results: first, Naor and Yung defined the notion of universal one-way hash functions and showed that the existence of such hash functions implies the existence of secure digital signature schemes. Subsequently, Rompel showed that universal one-way hash functions could be constructed from arbitrary one-way functions. Unfortunately, despite the importance of the result, a complete proof of the latter claim has never been published. In fact, a careful reading of Rompel's original conference publication reveals a number of errors in many of his arguments which have (seemingly) never been addressed. We provide here what is --- as far as we know --- the first complete write-up of Rompel's proof that universal one-way hash functions can be constructed from arbitrary one-way functions.
2005
EPRINT
Handling Expected Polynomial-Time Strategies in Simulation-Based Security Proofs
Jonathan Katz Yehuda Lindell
The standard class of adversaries considered in cryptography is that of {\em strict} polynomial-time probabilistic machines. However, {\em expected} polynomial-time machines are often also considered. For example, there are many zero-knowledge protocols for which the only known simulation techniques run in expected (and not strict) polynomial time. In addition, it has been shown that expected polynomial-time simulation is {\em essential} for achieving constant-round black-box zero-knowledge protocols. This reliance on expected polynomial-time simulation introduces a number of conceptual and technical difficulties. In this paper, we develop techniques for dealing with expected polynomial-time adversaries in simulation-based security proofs.
2005
EPRINT
Parallel and Concurrent Security of the HB and HB+ Protocols
Jonathan Katz Ji Sun Shin
At Crypto 2005, Juels and Weis (building on work of Hopper and Blum) proposed and analyzed two shared-key authentication protocols --- HB and HB+ --- whose extremely low computational cost makes them attractive for low-cost devices such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. Security of these protocols is based on the conjectured hardness of the ``learning parity with noise'' (LPN) problem: the HB protocol is proven secure against a passive (eavesdropping) adversary, while the HB+ protocol is proven secure against active attacks. Juels and Weis prove security of these protocols only for the case of sequential executions, and explicitly leave open the question of whether security holds also in the case of parallel or concurrent executions. In addition to guaranteeing security against a stronger class of adversaries, a positive answer to this question would allow the HB+ protocol to be parallelized, thereby reducing its round complexity from super-logarithmic (in the security parameter) to 3. Using a recent result by Regev (STOC 2005) regarding the LPN problem, we answer the aforementioned question in the affirmative and prove security of the HB and HB+ protocols under parallel/concurrent executions. Applying Regev's result also yields what we find to be substantially simpler security proofs for these protocols which are also more complete in that they explicitly address the dependence of the soundness error on the number of iterations.
2004
CRYPTO
2004
EUROCRYPT
2004
EPRINT
Improved Efficiency for CCA-Secure Cryptosystems Built Using Identity-Based Encryption
Dan Boneh Jonathan Katz
Recently, Canetti, Halevi, and Katz showed a general method for constructing CCA-secure encryption schemes from identity-based encryption schemes in the standard model. We improve the efficiency of their construction, and show two specific instantiations of our resulting scheme which offer the most efficient encryption (and, in one case, key generation) of any CCA-secure encryption scheme to date.
2004
EPRINT
Adaptively-Secure, Non-Interactive Public-Key Encryption
Ran Canetti Shai Halevi Jonathan Katz
Adaptively-secure encryption schemes ensure secrecy even in the presence of an adversary who can corrupt parties in an adaptive manner based on public keys, ciphertexts, and secret data of already-corrupted parties. Ideally, an adaptively-secure encryption scheme should, like standard public-key encryption, allow arbitrarily-many parties to use a single encryption key to securely encrypt arbitrarily-many messages to a given receiver who maintains only a single short decryption key. However, it is known that these requirements are impossible to achieve: no non-interactive encryption scheme that supports encryption of an unbounded number of messages and uses a single, unchanging decryption key can be adaptively secure. Impossibility holds even if secure data erasure is possible. We show that this limitation can be overcome by updating the decryption key over time and making some mild assumptions about the frequency of communication between parties. Using this approach, we construct adaptively-secure, completely non-interactive encryption schemes supporting secure encryption of arbitrarily-many messages from arbitrarily-many senders. Our schemes additionally provide forward security and security against chosen-ciphertext attacks.
2004
EPRINT
Reducing Complexity Assumptions for Statistically-Hiding Commitment
Determining the minimal assumptions needed to construct various cryptographic building blocks has been a focal point of research in theoretical cryptography. For most --- but not all! --- cryptographic primitives, complexity assumptions both necessary and sufficient for their existence are known. Here, we revisit the following, decade-old question: what are the minimal assumptions needed to construct a statistically-hiding bit commitment scheme? Previously, it was known how to construct such schemes based on any one-way permutation. In this work, we show that regular one-way functions suffice. We show two constructions of statistically-hiding commitment schemes from regular one-way functions. Our first construction is more direct, and serves as a ``stepping-stone'' for our second construction which has improved round complexity. Of independent interest, as part of our work we show a compiler transforming any commitment scheme which is statistically-hiding against an honest-but-curious receiver to one which is statistically-hiding against a malicious receiver. This demonstrates the equivalence of these two formulations of the problem. Our results also improve the complexity assumptions needed for statistical zero-knowledge arguments.
2003
CRYPTO
2003
EUROCRYPT
2003
EUROCRYPT
2003
EUROCRYPT
2003
PKC
2003
EPRINT
A Forward-Secure Public-Key Encryption Scheme
Ran Canetti Shai Halevi Jonathan Katz
Cryptographic computations are often carried out on insecure devices for which the threat of key exposure represents a serious and realistic concern. In an effort to mitigate the damage caused by exposure of secret keys stored on such devices, the paradigm of \emph{forward security} was introduced. In a forward-secure scheme, secret keys are updated at regular periods of time; exposure of the secret key corresponding to a given time period does not enable an adversary to ``break'' the scheme (in the appropriate sense) for any \emph{prior} time period. A number of constructions of forward-secure digital signature schemes, key-exchange protocols, and symmetric-key schemes are known. We present the first non-trivial constructions of (non-interactive) forward-secure public-key encryption schemes. Our main construction achieves security against chosen-plaintext attacks under the decisional bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption in the standard model. This scheme is practical, and all parameters grow at most logarithmically with the total number of time periods. We also give a slightly more efficient scheme in the random oracle model. Both our schemes can be extended to achieve security against chosen-ciphertext attacks and to support an unbounded number of time periods. Toward our goal, we introduce the notion of \emph{binary tree encryption} and show how to construct a binary tree encryption scheme in the standard model. This new primitive may be of independent interest. In particular, we use it to construct the first known example of a (hierarchical) identity-based encryption scheme that is secure in the standard model. (Here, however, the notion of security we achieve is slightly weaker than what is achieved in some previous constructions in the random oracle model.)
2003
EPRINT
Scalable Protocols for Authenticated Group Key Exchange
Jonathan Katz Moti Yung
We consider the fundamental problem of authenticated group key exchange among $n$ parties within a larger and insecure public network. A number of solutions to this problem have been proposed; however, all provably-secure solutions thus far are not scalable and, in particular, require $O(n)$ rounds. Our main contribution is the first {\em scalable} protocol for this problem along with a rigorous proof of security in the standard model under the DDH assumption; our protocol uses a constant number of rounds and requires only $O(1)$ ``full'' modular exponentiations per user. Toward this goal and of independent interest, we first present a scalable compiler that transforms any group key-exchange protocol secure against a passive eavesdropper to an \emph{authenticated} protocol which is secure against an active adversary who controls all communication in the network. This compiler adds only one round and $O(1)$ communication (per user) to the original scheme. We then prove secure --- against a passive adversary --- a variant of the two-round group key-exchange protocol of Burmester and Desmedt. Applying our compiler to this protocol results in a provably-secure three-round protocol for \emph{authenticated} group key exchange which also achieves forward secrecy.
2003
EPRINT
Chosen-Ciphertext Security from Identity-Based Encryption
Ran Canetti Shai Halevi Jonathan Katz
We show how to construct a CCA-secure public-key encryption scheme from any CPA-secure identity-based encryption (IBE) scheme. Our conversion from IBE to a CCA-secure scheme is simple, efficient, and provably secure in the standard model (i.e., security of the resulting scheme does not rely on the random oracle model). In addition, the resulting scheme achieves CCA security even if the underlying IBE scheme satisfies only a ``weak'' notion of security which is known to be achievable in the standard model based on the bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption. Thus, our results yield a new construction of CCA-secure public-key encryption in the standard model. Interestingly, the resulting scheme avoids any non-interactive proofs of ``well-formedness'' which were shown to underlie all previously-known constructions. We also extend our technique to obtain a simple and reasonably efficient method for securing any BTE scheme against adaptive chosen-ciphertext attacks. This, in turn, yields more efficient constructions of CCA-secure (hierarchical) identity-based and forward-secure encryption schemes in the standard model. Our results --- building on previous black-box separations --- rule out black-box constructions of IBE from CPA-secure public-key encryption.
2002
ASIACRYPT
2002
EUROCRYPT
2002
EPRINT
Efficient and Non-Malleable Proofs of Plaintext Knowledge and Applications
Jonathan Katz
We describe very efficient protocols for non-malleable (interactive) proofs of plaintext knowledge for the RSA, Rabin, Paillier, and El-Gamal encryption schemes whose security can be proven in the standard model. We also highlight some important applications of these protocols, where we take care to ensure that our protocols remain secure when run in an asynchronous, concurrent environment: --- Chosen-ciphertext-secure, interactive encryption: In some settings where both parties are on-line (e.g., SSL), an interactive encryption protocol may be used. We construct chosen-ciphertext-secure interactive encryption schemes based on any of the schemes above. In each case, the improved scheme requires only a small overhead beyond the original, semantically-secure scheme. --- Password-based authenticated key exchange: We provide efficient protocols for password-based authenticated key exchange in the public- key model \cite{HK98,B99}. Security of our protocols may be based on any of the cryptosystems mentioned above. --- Deniable authentication: We demonstrate deniable authentication protocols satisfying the strongest notion of security. These are the first efficient constructions based on, e.g., the RSA or computational Diffie-Hellman assumptions. Our techniques provide a general methodology for constructing efficient \emph{non-malleable} (zero-knowledge) proofs of knowledge when shared parameters are available (for our intended applications, these parameters can simply be included as part of users' public keys). Thus, non-malleable proofs of knowledge are easy to achieve ``in practice''.
2002
EPRINT
A Forward-Secure Public-Key Encryption Scheme
Jonathan Katz
Cryptographic computations are often carried out on insecure devices for which the threat of key exposure represents a serious and realistic concern. In an effort to mitigate the damage caused by exposure of secret data stored on such devices, the paradigm of \emph{forward security} was introduced. In this model, secret keys are updated at regular intervals throughout the lifetime of the system; furthermore, exposure of a secret key corresponding to a given interval does not enable an adversary to ``break'' the system (in the appropriate sense) for any \emph{prior} time period. A number of constructions of forward-secure digital signature schemes and symmetric-key schemes are known. We present the first construction of a forward-secure public-key encryption scheme whose security is based on the bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption in the random oracle model. Our scheme can be extended to achieve chosen-ciphertext security at minimal additional cost. The construction we give is quite efficient: all parameters of the scheme grow (at most) poly-logarithmically with the total number of time periods.
2002
EPRINT
Key-Insulated Public-Key Cryptosystems
Cryptographic computations (decryption, signature generation, etc.) are often performed on a relatively insecure device (e.g., a mobile device or an Internet-connected host) which cannot be trusted to maintain secrecy of the private key. We propose and investigate the notion of \emph{key-insulated security} whose goal is to minimize the damage caused by secret-key exposures. In our model, the secret key(s) stored on the insecure device are refreshed at discrete time periods via interaction with a physically-secure --- but computationally-limited --- device which stores a ``master key''. All cryptographic computations are still done on the insecure device, and the public key remains unchanged. In a (t, N)-key-insulated scheme, an adversary who compromises the insecure device and obtains secret keys for up to t periods of his choice is unable to violate the security of the cryptosystem for \emph{any} of the remaining N-t periods. Furthermore, the scheme remains secure (for \emph{all} time periods) against an adversary who compromises \emph{only} the physically-secure device. We notice that key-insulated schemes significantly improve the security guarantee of forward-secure schemes [A97,BM99], in which exposure of the secret key at even a single time period (necessarily) compromises the security of the system for all future time periods. This improvement is achieved with minimal cost: infrequent key updates with a (possibly untrusted) secure device. We focus primarily on key-insulated public-key encryption. We construct a (t,N)-key-insulated encryption scheme based on any (standard) public-key encryption scheme, and give a more efficient construction based on the DDH assumption. The latter construction is then extended to achieve chosen-ciphertext security.
2001
EUROCRYPT
2001
EUROCRYPT
2001
EUROCRYPT
2001
FSE
2001
EPRINT
Efficient Password-Authenticated Key Exchange Using Human-Memorable Passwords
Jonathan Katz Rafail Ostrovsky Moti Yung
We present an efficient password-authenticated key exchange protocol which is secure against off-line dictionary attacks even when users choose passwords from a very small space (say, a dictionary of English words). We prove security in the standard model under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption, assuming public parameters generated by a trusted party. Compared to the recent work of Goldreich and Lindell (which was the first to give a secure construction, under general assumptions, in the standard model), our protocol requires only 3 rounds and is efficient enough to be used in practice.
2001
EPRINT
Efficient and Non-Interactive Non-Malleable Commitment
We present new constructions of non-malleable commitment schemes, in the public parameter model (where a trusted party makes parameters available to all parties), based on the discrete logarithm or RSA assumptions. The main features of our schemes are: they achieve near-optimal communication for arbitrarily-large messages and are non-interactive. Previous schemes either required (several rounds of) interaction or focused on achieving non-malleable commitment based on general assumptions and were thus efficient only when committing to a single bit. Although our main constructions are for the case of perfectly-hiding commitment, we also present a communication-efficient, non-interactive commitment scheme (based on general assumptions) that is perfectly binding.
2001
EPRINT
Threshold Cryptosystems Based on Factoring
Jonathan Katz Moti Yung
We consider threshold cryptosystems over a composite modulus $N$ where the \emph{factors} of $N$ are shared among the participants as the secret key. This is a new paradigm for threshold cryptosystems based on a composite modulus, differing from the typical treatment of RSA-based systems where a ``decryption exponent'' is shared among the participants. Our approach yields solutions to some open problems in threshold cryptography; in particular, we obtain the following: 1. \emph{Threshold homomorphic encryption}. A number of applications (e.g., electronic voting or efficient multi-party computation) require threshold homomorphic encryption schemes. We present a protocol for threshold decryption of the homomorphic Goldwasser-Micali encryption scheme \cite{GM84}, answering an open question of \cite{FPS00}. 2. \emph{Threshold cryptosystems as secure as factoring}. We describe a threshold version of a variant of the signature standards ISO 9796-2 and PKCS\#1 v1.5 (cf.\ \cite[Section 11.3.4]{MvOV}), thus giving the first threshold signature scheme whose security (in the random oracle model) is equivalent to the hardness of factoring \cite{C02}. Our techniques may be adapted to distribute the Rabin encryption scheme \cite{R79} whose semantic security may be reduced to the hardness of factoring. 3. \emph{Efficient threshold schemes without a trusted dealer.} Because our schemes only require sharing of $N$ --- which furthermore need not be a product of strong primes --- our schemes are very efficient (compared to previous schemes) when a trusted dealer is not assumed and key generation is done in a distributed manner. Extensions to achieve robustness and proactivation are also possible with our schemes.
2000
FSE

Program Committees

Crypto 2017
TCC 2016
Crypto 2016
PKC 2015
Eurocrypt 2013
Crypto 2013
Asiacrypt 2012
TCC 2012
Eurocrypt 2011
PKC 2010
Asiacrypt 2010
Eurocrypt 2009
Crypto 2009
Asiacrypt 2008
Eurocrypt 2008
Asiacrypt 2007
TCC 2007
PKC 2007
TCC 2006
Eurocrypt 2006
Crypto 2006
Crypto 2005
Asiacrypt 2004
Crypto 2003

Coauthors

Martin R. Albrecht (1)
Joël Alwen (2)
Daniel Apon (3)
Giuseppe Ateniese (1)
Adam Bender (3)
Dan Boneh (3)
Xavier Boyen (1)
Zvika Brakerski (2)
Enrico Buonanno (1)
Ran Canetti (9)
T.-H. Hubert Chan (1)
Jung Hee Cheon (1)
Seung Geol Choi (8)
Kai-Min Chung (2)
Carlos Cid (2)
Benoît Cogliati (1)
Giovanni Di Crescenzo (2)
Dana Dachman-Soled (5)
Yevgeniy Dodis (10)
David Evans (1)
Xiong Fan (1)
Serge Fehr (2)
Nils Fleischhacker (2)
David Freeman (2)
Georg Fuchsbauer (2)
Juan A. Garay (1)
Rosario Gennaro (1)
Craig Gentry (1)
Shafi Goldwasser (1)
S. Dov Gordon (11)
Vipul Goyal (3)
Adam Groce (3)
Siyao Guo (1)
Iftach Haitner (2)
Shai Halevi (10)
Carmit Hazay (2)
Viet Tung Hoang (2)
Cheng Hong (1)
Omer Horvitz (4)
Yan Huang (3)
Yuval Ishai (1)
Abhishek Jain (1)
Yael Tauman Kalai (1)
Seny Kamara (2)
Vladimir Kolesnikov (3)
Chiu-Yuen Koo (9)
Hugo Krawczyk (1)
Ranjit Kumaresan (6)
Eyal Kushilevitz (1)
Jooyoung Lee (1)
Éric Levieil (1)
Yehuda Lindell (10)
Feng-Hao Liu (4)
Wen-jie Lu (1)
Anna Lysyanskaya (2)
Philip D. MacKenzie (2)
Lior Malka (1)
Alex J. Malozemoff (6)
Ueli Maurer (2)
Allen McIntosh (1)
Ruggero Morselli (6)
Steven Myers (1)
David Naccache (2)
Kartik Nayak (1)
Adam O'Neill (1)
Rafail Ostrovsky (8)
Giuseppe Persiano (1)
Erez Petrank (1)
Antigoni Polychroniadou (1)
Tal Rabin (1)
Samuel Ranellucci (1)
Vanishree Rao (1)
Leonid Reyzin (2)
Mike Rosulek (1)
Amit Sahai (3)
Dominique Schröder (5)
Gil Segev (1)
Jae Hong Seo (1)
Ronen Shaltiel (2)
Abhi Shelat (1)
Elaine Shi (7)
Ji Sun Shin (4)
Adam Smith (9)
Fang Song (2)
John P. Steinberger (1)
Björn Tackmann (2)
Aishwarya Thiruvengadam (7)
Vinod Vaikuntanathan (7)
Ivan Visconti (1)
Shabsi Walfish (1)
Xiao Shaun Wang (1)
Xiao Wang (4)
Brent Waters (5)
Hoeteck Wee (1)
Shouhuai Xu (3)
Arkady Yerukhimovich (6)
Moti Yung (13)
Mohammad Zaheri (1)
Zhe Zhang (1)
Hong-Sheng Zhou (13)
Hong Sheng Zhou (1)
Vassilis Zikas (7)