International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Markulf Kohlweiss

Affiliation: Microsoft Research and University of Edinburgh, UK

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
PKC
Decentralizing Inner-Product Functional Encryption
Multi-client functional encryption (MCFE) is a more flexible variant of functional encryption whose functional decryption involves multiple ciphertexts from different parties. Each party holds a different secret key and can independently and adaptively be corrupted by the adversary. We present two compilers for MCFE schemes for the inner-product functionality, both of which support encryption labels. Our first compiler transforms any scheme with a special key-derivation property into a decentralized scheme, as defined by Chotard et al. (ASIACRYPT 2018), thus allowing for a simple distributed way of generating functional decryption keys without a trusted party. Our second compiler allows to lift an unnatural restriction present in existing (decentralized) MCFE schemes, which requires the adversary to ask for a ciphertext from each party. We apply our compilers to the works of Abdalla et al. (CRYPTO 2018) and Chotard et al. (ASIACRYPT 2018) to obtain schemes with hitherto unachieved properties. From Abdalla et al., we obtain instantiations of DMCFE schemes in the standard model (from DDH, Paillier, or LWE) but without labels. From Chotard et al., we obtain a DMCFE scheme with labels still in the random oracle model, but without pairings.
2018
CRYPTO
Updatable and Universal Common Reference Strings with Applications to zk-SNARKs 📺
By design, existing (pre-processing) zk-SNARKs embed a secret trapdoor in a relation-dependent common reference strings (CRS). The trapdoor is exploited by a (hypothetical) simulator to prove the scheme is zero knowledge, and the secret-dependent structure facilitates a linear-size CRS and linear-time prover computation. If known by a real party, however, the trapdoor can be used to subvert the security of the system. The structured CRS that makes zk-SNARKs practical also makes deploying zk-SNARKS problematic, as it is difficult to argue why the trapdoor would not be available to the entity responsible for generating the CRS. Moreover, for pre-processing zk-SNARKs a new trusted CRS needs to be computed every time the relation is changed.In this paper, we address both issues by proposing a model where a number of users can update a universal CRS. The updatable CRS model guarantees security if at least one of the users updating the CRS is honest. We provide both a negative result, by showing that zk-SNARKs with private secret-dependent polynomials in the CRS cannot be updatable, and a positive result by constructing a zk-SNARK based on a CRS consisting only of secret-dependent monomials. The CRS is of quadratic size, is updatable, and is universal in the sense that it can be specialized into one or more relation-dependent CRS of linear size with linear-time prover computation.
2018
ASIACRYPT
State Separation for Code-Based Game-Playing Proofs
The security analysis of real-world protocols involves reduction steps that are conceptually simple but still have to account for many protocol complications found in standards and implementations. Taking inspiration from universal composability, abstract cryptography, process algebras, and type-based verification frameworks, we propose a method to simplify large reductions, avoid mistakes in carrying them out, and obtain concise security statements.Our method decomposes monolithic games into collections of stateful packages representing collections of oracles that call one another using well-defined interfaces. Every component scheme yields a pair of a real and an ideal package. In security proofs, we then successively replace each real package with its ideal counterpart, treating the other packages as the reduction. We build this reduction by applying a number of algebraic operations on packages justified by their state separation. Our method handles reductions that emulate the game perfectly, and leaves more complex arguments to existing game-based proof techniques such as the code-based analysis suggested by Bellare and Rogaway. It also facilitates computer-aided proofs, inasmuch as the perfect reductions steps can be automatically discharged by proof assistants.We illustrate our method on two generic composition proofs: a proof of self-composition using a hybrid argument; and the composition of keying and keyed components. For concreteness, we apply them to the KEM-DEM proof of hybrid-encryption by Cramer and Shoup and to the composition of forward-secure game-based key exchange protocols with symmetric-key protocols.
2016
JOFC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
PKC
2015
EUROCRYPT
2015
EUROCRYPT
2015
ASIACRYPT
2014
CRYPTO
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
ASIACRYPT
2013
PKC
2013
PKC
2013
TCC
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
ASIACRYPT
2011
ASIACRYPT
2009
PKC
2009
PKC
2009
CRYPTO
2008
TCC
2008
EPRINT
Delegatable Anonymous Credentials
We construct an efficient delegatable anonymous credential system. Users can anonymously and unlinkably obtain credentials from any authority, delegate their credentials to other users, and prove possession of a credential $L$ levels away from the given authority. The size of the proof (and time to compute it) is $O(Lk)$, where $k$ is the security parameter. The only other construction of delegatable anonymous credentials (Chase and Lysyanskaya, Crypto 2006) relies on general non-interactive proofs for NP-complete languages of size $k \Omega(2^{L})$. We revise the entire approach to constructing anonymous credentials and identify \emph{randomizable} zero-knowledge proof of knowledge systems as the key building block. We formally define the notion of randomizable non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs, and give the first construction by showing how to appropriately rerandomize Groth and Sahai (Eurocrypt 2008) proofs. We show that such proof systems, in combination with an appropriate authentication scheme and a few other protocols, allow us to construct delegatable anonymous credentials. Finally, we instantiate these building blocks under appropriate assumptions about groups with bilinear maps.
2008
EPRINT
An Accumulator Based on Bilinear Maps and Efficient Revocation for Anonymous Credentials
Jan Camenisch Markulf Kohlweiss Claudio Soriente
The success of electronic authentication systems, be it e-ID card systems or Internet authentication systems such as CardSpace, highly depends on the provided level of user-privacy. Thereby, an important requirement is an efficient means for revocation of the authentication credentials. In this paper we consider the problem of revocation for certificate-based privacy-protecting authentication systems. To date, the most efficient solutions for revocation for such systems are based on cryptographic accumulators. Here, an accumulate of all currently valid certificates is published regularly and each user holds a {\em witness} enabling her to prove the validity of her (anonymous) credential while retaining anonymity. Unfortunately, the users' witnesses must be updated at least each time a credential is revoked. For the know solutions, these updates are computationally very expensive for users and/or certificate issuers which is very problematic as revocation is a frequent event as practice shows. In this paper, we propose a new dynamic accumulator scheme based on bilinear maps and show how to apply it to the problem of revocation of anonymous credentials. In the resulting scheme, proving a credential's validity and updating witnesses both come at (virtually) no cost for credential owners and verifiers. In particular, updating a witness requires the issuer to do only one multiplication per addition or revocation of a credential and can also be delegated to untrusted entities from which a user could just retrieve the updated witness. We believe that thereby we provide the first authentication system offering privacy protection suitable for implementation with electronic tokens such as eID cards or drivers' licenses.
2007
EPRINT
Non-Interactive Anonymous Credentials
In this paper, we introduce P-signatures. A P-signature scheme consists of a signature scheme, a commitment scheme, and (1) an interactive protocol for obtaining a signature on a committed value; (2) a non-interactive proof system for proving that the contents of a commitment has been signed; (3) a non-interactive proof system for proving that a pair of commitments are commitments to the same value. We give a definition of security for P-signatures and show how they can be realized under appropriate assumptions about groups with bilinear map. Namely, we make extensive use of the powerful suite of non-interactive proof techniques due to Groth and Sahai. Our P-signatures enable, for the first time, the design of a practical non-interactive anonymous credential system whose security does not rely on the random oracle model. In addition, they may serve as a useful building block for other privacy-preserving authentication mechanisms.
2006
EPRINT
How to Win the Clone Wars: \\ Efficient Periodic n-Times Anonymous Authentication
We create a credential system that lets a user anonymously authenticate at most $n$ times in a single time period. A user withdraws a dispenser of $n$ e-tokens. She shows an e-token to a verifier to authenticate herself; each e-token can be used only once, however, the dispenser automatically refreshes every time period. The only prior solution to this problem, due to Damg{\aa}rd et al.~[DDP05], uses protocols that are a factor of $k$ slower for the user and verifier, where $k$ is the security parameter. Damg{\aa}rd et al. also only support one authentication per time period, while we support $n$. Because our construction is based on e-cash, we can use existing techniques to identify a cheating user, trace all of her e-tokens, and revoke her dispensers. We also offer a new anonymity service: glitch protection for basically honest users who (occasionally) reuse e-tokens. The verifier can always recognize a reused e-token; however, we preserve the anonymity of users who do not reuse e-tokens too often.

Program Committees

Crypto 2018
PKC 2018
PKC 2017
Eurocrypt 2015