International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Mira Belenkiy

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2010
EPRINT
Cryptographic Agility and its Relation to Circular Encryption
We initiate a provable-security treatment of cryptographic \emph{agility}. A primitive (for example PRFs, authenticated encryption schemes or digital signatures) is agile when multiple, individually secure schemes can securely share the same key. We provide a surprising connection between two seemingly unrelated but challenging questions. The first, new to this paper, is whether wPRFs (weak-PRFs) are agile. The second, already posed several times in the literature, is whether every secure (IND-R) encryption scheme is secure when encrypting cycles. We resolve the second question in the negative and thereby the first as well. We go on to provide a comprehensive treatment of agility, with definitions for various different primitives. We explain the practical motivations for agility. We provide foundational results that show to what extent it is achievable and practical constructions to achieve it to the best extent possible. On the theoretical side our work uncovers new notions and relations and settles stated open questions, and on the practical side it serves to guide developers.
2010
EUROCRYPT
2009
CRYPTO
2008
TCC
2008
EPRINT
Disjunctive Multi-Level Secret Sharing
Mira Belenkiy
A disjunctive multi-level secret sharing scheme divides users into different levels. Each level L is associated with a threshold t_L, and a group of users can only recover the secret if, for some L, there are at least t_L users at levels 0....L in the group. We present a simple ideal disjunctive multi-level secret sharing scheme -- in fact, the simplest and most direct scheme to date. It is the first polynomial-time solution that allows the dealer to add new users dynamically. Our solution is by far the most efficient; the dealer must perform O(t) field operations per user, where t is the highest threshold in the system. We demonstrate the simplicity of our scheme by extending our construction into a distributed commitment scheme using standard techniques.
2008
EPRINT
Delegatable Anonymous Credentials
We construct an efficient delegatable anonymous credential system. Users can anonymously and unlinkably obtain credentials from any authority, delegate their credentials to other users, and prove possession of a credential $L$ levels away from the given authority. The size of the proof (and time to compute it) is $O(Lk)$, where $k$ is the security parameter. The only other construction of delegatable anonymous credentials (Chase and Lysyanskaya, Crypto 2006) relies on general non-interactive proofs for NP-complete languages of size $k \Omega(2^{L})$. We revise the entire approach to constructing anonymous credentials and identify \emph{randomizable} zero-knowledge proof of knowledge systems as the key building block. We formally define the notion of randomizable non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs, and give the first construction by showing how to appropriately rerandomize Groth and Sahai (Eurocrypt 2008) proofs. We show that such proof systems, in combination with an appropriate authentication scheme and a few other protocols, allow us to construct delegatable anonymous credentials. Finally, we instantiate these building blocks under appropriate assumptions about groups with bilinear maps.
2007
EPRINT
Non-Interactive Anonymous Credentials
In this paper, we introduce P-signatures. A P-signature scheme consists of a signature scheme, a commitment scheme, and (1) an interactive protocol for obtaining a signature on a committed value; (2) a non-interactive proof system for proving that the contents of a commitment has been signed; (3) a non-interactive proof system for proving that a pair of commitments are commitments to the same value. We give a definition of security for P-signatures and show how they can be realized under appropriate assumptions about groups with bilinear map. Namely, we make extensive use of the powerful suite of non-interactive proof techniques due to Groth and Sahai. Our P-signatures enable, for the first time, the design of a practical non-interactive anonymous credential system whose security does not rely on the random oracle model. In addition, they may serve as a useful building block for other privacy-preserving authentication mechanisms.