International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Daniel Slamanig

Affiliation: Graz University of Technology

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2020
PKC
Bringing Order to Chaos: The Case of Collision-Resistant Chameleon-Hashes 📺
David Derler Kai Samelin Daniel Slamanig
Chameleon-hash functions, introduced by Krawczyk and Rabin at NDSS 2000, are trapdoor collision-resistant hash-functions parametrized by a public key. If the corresponding secret key is known, arbitrary collisions for the hash function can be efficiently found. Chameleon-hash functions have prominent applications in the design of cryptographic primitives, such as lifting non-adaptively secure signatures to adaptively secure ones. Recently, this primitive also received a lot of attention as a building block in more complex cryptographic applications ranging from editable blockchains to advanced signature and encryption schemes. We observe that in latter applications various different notions of collision-resistance are used, and it is not always clear if the respective notion does really cover what seems intuitively required by the application. Therefore, we revisit existing collision-resistance notions in the literature, study their relations, and—using the example of the recent redactable blockchain proposals—discuss which practical impact different notions of collision-resistance might have. Moreover, we provide a stronger, and arguably more desirable, notion of collision-resistance than what is known from the literature. Finally, we present a surprisingly simple and efficient black-box construction of chameleon-hash functions achieving this strong notion.
2019
ASIACRYPT
Structure-Preserving Signatures on Equivalence Classes from Standard Assumptions
Structure-preserving signatures on equivalence classes (SPS-EQ) introduced at ASIACRYPT 2014 are a variant of SPS where a message is considered as a projective equivalence class, and a new representative of the same class can be obtained by multiplying a vector by a scalar. Given a message and corresponding signature, anyone can produce an updated and randomized signature on an arbitrary representative from the same equivalence class. SPS-EQ have proven to be a very versatile building block for many cryptographic applications.In this paper, we present the first EUF-CMA secure SPS-EQ scheme under standard assumptions. So far only constructions in the generic group model are known. One recent candidate under standard assumptions are the weakly secure equivalence class signatures by Fuchsbauer and Gay (PKC’18), a variant of SPS-EQ satisfying only a weaker unforgeability and adaption notion. Fuchsbauer and Gay show that this weaker unforgeability notion is sufficient for many known applications of SPS-EQ. Unfortunately, the weaker adaption notion is only proper for a semi-honest (passive) model and as we show in this paper, makes their scheme unusable in the current models for almost all of their advertised applications of SPS-EQ from the literature.We then present a new EUF-CMA secure SPS-EQ scheme with a tight security reduction under the SXDH assumption providing the notion of perfect adaption (under malicious keys). To achieve the strongest notion of perfect adaption under malicious keys, we require a common reference string (CRS), which seems inherent for constructions under standard assumptions. However, for most known applications of SPS-EQ we do not require a trusted CRS (as the CRS can be generated by the signer during key generation). Technically, our construction is inspired by a recent work of Gay et al. (EUROCRYPT’18), who construct a tightly secure message authentication code and translate it to an SPS scheme adapting techniques due to Bellare and Goldwasser (CRYPTO’89).
2019
JOFC
Structure-Preserving Signatures on Equivalence Classes and Constant-Size Anonymous Credentials
Structure-preserving signatures (SPS) are a powerful building block for cryptographic protocols. We introduce SPS on equivalence classes (SPS-EQ), which allow joint randomization of messages and signatures. Messages are projective equivalence classes defined on group-element vectors, so multiplying a vector by a scalar yields a different representative of the same class. Our scheme lets one adapt a signature for one representative to a signature for another representative without knowledge of any secret. Moreover, given a signature, an adapted signature for a different representative is indistinguishable from a fresh signature on a random message. We propose a definitional framework for SPS-EQ and an efficient construction in Type-3 bilinear groups, which we prove secure against generic forgers. We also introduce set-commitment schemes that let one open subsets of the committed set. From this and SPS-EQ, we then build an efficient multi-show attribute-based anonymous credential system for an arbitrary number of attributes. Our ABC system avoids costly zero-knowledge proofs and only requires a short interactive proof to thwart replay attacks. It is the first credential system whose bandwidth required for credential showing is independent of the number of its attributes, i.e., constant-size. We propose strengthened game-based security definitions for ABC and prove our scheme anonymous against malicious organizations in the standard model; finally, we discuss a concurrently secure variant in the CRS model.
2018
EUROCRYPT
2018
PKC
Revisiting Proxy Re-encryption: Forward Secrecy, Improved Security, and Applications
We revisit the notion of proxy re-encryption ($$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE), an enhanced public-key encryption primitive envisioned by Blaze et al. (Eurocrypt’98) and formalized by Ateniese et al. (NDSS’05) for delegating decryption rights from a delegator to a delegatee using a semi-trusted proxy. $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE notably allows to craft re-encryption keys in order to equip the proxy with the power of transforming ciphertexts under a delegator’s public key to ciphertexts under a delegatee’s public key, while not learning anything about the underlying plaintexts.We study an attractive cryptographic property for $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE, namely that of forward secrecy. In our forward-secret $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE (fs-$$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE) definition, the proxy periodically evolves the re-encryption keys and permanently erases old versions while he delegator’s public key is kept constant. As a consequence, ciphertexts for old periods are no longer re-encryptable and, in particular, cannot be decrypted anymore at the delegatee’s end. Moreover, delegators evolve their secret keys too, and, thus, not even they can decrypt old ciphertexts once their key material from past periods has been deleted. This, as we will discuss, directly has application in short-term data/message-sharing scenarios.Technically, we formalize fs-$$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE. Thereby, we identify a subtle but significant gap in the well-established security model for conventional $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE and close it with our formalization (which we dub fs-$$\mathsf {PRE} ^+$$PRE+). We present the first provably secure and efficient constructions of fs-$$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE as well as $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE (implied by the former) satisfying the strong fs-$$\mathsf {PRE} ^+$$PRE+ and $$\mathsf {PRE} ^+$$PRE+ notions, respectively. All our constructions are instantiable in the standard model under standard assumptions and our central building block are hierarchical identity-based encryption ($$\mathsf {HIBE}$$HIBE) schemes that only need to be selectively secure.
2017
PKC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
CRYPTO
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
ASIACRYPT