International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Srinivasan Raghuraman

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2021
PKC
Multi-Party Threshold Private Set Intersection with Sublinear Communication 📺
In multi-party threshold private set intersection (PSI), $n$ parties each with a private set wish to compute the intersection of their sets if the intersection is sufficiently large. Previously, Ghosh and Simkin (CRYPTO 2019) studied this problem for the two-party case and demonstrated interesting lower and upper bounds on the communication complexity. In this work, we investigate the communication complexity of the multi-party setting $(n\geq 2)$. We consider two functionalities for multi-party threshold PSI. In the first, parties learn the intersection if each of their sets and the intersection differ by at most $T$. In the second functionality, parties learn the intersection if the union of all their sets and the intersection differ by at most $T$. For both functionalities, we show that any protocol must have communication complexity $\Omega(nT)$. We build protocols with a matching upper bound of $O(nT)$ communication complexity for both functionalities assuming threshold FHE. We also construct a computationally more efficient protocol for the second functionality with communication complexity $\widetilde{O}(nT)$ under a weaker assumption of threshold additive homomorphic encryption. As a direct implication, we solve one of the open problems in the work of Ghosh and Simkin (CRYPTO 2019) by designing a two-party protocol with communication cost $\widetilde{O}(T)$ from assumptions weaker than FHE. As a consequence of our results, we achieve the first "regular" multi-party PSI protocol where the communication complexity only grows with the size of the set difference and does not depend on the size of the input sets.
2021
CRYPTO
Silver: Silent VOLE and Oblivious Transfer from Hardness of Decoding Structured LDPC Codes
Peter Rindal Srinivasan Raghuraman Geoffroy Couteau
We put forth new protocols for oblivious transfer extension and vector OLE, called \emph{Silver}, for SILent Vole and oblivious transfER. Silver offers extremely high performances: generating 10 million random OTs on one core of a standard laptop requires only 300ms of computation and 122KB of communication. This represents 37% less computation and ~1300x less communication than the standard IKNP protocol, as well as ~4x less computation and ~4x less communication than the recent protocol of Yang et al. (CCS 2020). Silver is \emph{silent}: after a one-time cheap interaction, two parties can store small seeds, from which they can later \emph{locally} generate a large number of OTs \emph{while remaining offline}. Neither IKNP nor Yang et al. enjoys this feature; compared to the best known silent OT extension protocol of Boyle et al. (CCS 2019), upon which we build up, Silver has 19x less computation, and the same communication. Due to its attractive efficiency features, Silver yields major efficiency improvements in numerous MPC protocols. Our approach is a radical departure from the standard paradigm for building MPC protocols, in that we do \emph{not} attempt to base our constructions on a well-studied assumption. Rather, we follow an approach closer in spirit to the standard paradigm in the design of symmetric primitives: we identify a set of fundamental structural properties that allow us to withstand all known attacks, and put forth a candidate design, guided by our analysis. We also rely on extensive experimentations to analyze our candidate and experimentally validate their properties. In essence, our approach boils down to constructing new families of linear codes with (plausibly) high minimum distance and extremely low encoding time. While further analysis is of course warranted to confidently assess the security of Silver, we hope and believe that initiating this approach to the design of MPC primitives will pave the way to new secure primitives with extremely attractive efficiency features.
2020
EUROCRYPT
Efficient Constructions for Almost-everywhere Secure Computation 📺
Siddhartha Jayanti Srinivasan Raghuraman Nikhil Vyas
We study the problem of {\em almost-everywhere reliable message transmission}; a key component in designing efficient and secure MPC protocols for sparsely connected networks. The goal is to design low-degree networks which allow a large fraction of honest nodes to communicate reliably even while linearly many nodes can experience byzantine corruption and deviate arbitrarily from the assigned protocol.\\ \noindent In this paper, we achieve a $\log$-degree network with a polylogarithmic work complexity protocol, thereby improving over the state-of-the-art result of Chandran {\em et al.} (ICALP 2010) who required a polylogarithmic-degree network and had a linear work complexity. In addition, we also achieve: \begin{itemize} \item A work efficient version of Dwork et. al.'s (STOC 1986) butterfly network. \item An improvement upon the state of the art protocol of Ben-or and Ron (Information Processing Letters 1996) in the randomized corruption model---both in work-efficiency and in resilience.
2020
ASIACRYPT
KVaC: Key-Value Commitments for Blockchains and Beyond 📺
Shashank Agrawal Srinivasan Raghuraman
As blockchains grow in size, validating new transactions becomes more and more resource intensive. To deal with this, there is a need to discover compact encodings of the (effective) state of a blockchain --- an encoding that allows for efficient proofs of membership and updates. In the case of account-based cryptocurrencies, the state can be represented by a key-value map, where keys are the account addresses and values consist of account balance, nonce, etc. We propose a new commitment scheme for key-value maps whose size does not grow with the number of keys, yet proofs of membership are of constant-size. In fact, both the encoding and the proofs consist of just two and three group elements respectively (in groups of unknown order like class groups). Verifying and updating proofs involves just a few group exponentiations. Additive updates to key values enjoy the same level of efficiency too. Key-value commitments can be used to build dynamic accumulators and vector commitments, which find applications in group signatures, anonymous credentials, verifiable databases, interactive oracle proofs, etc. Using our new key-value commitment, we provide the most efficient constructions of (sub)vector commitments to date.
2017
PKC
2016
CRYPTO
2016
PKC
2016
TCC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT