International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Stephan Krenn

Affiliation: AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2018
PKC
Revisiting Proxy Re-encryption: Forward Secrecy, Improved Security, and Applications
We revisit the notion of proxy re-encryption ($$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE), an enhanced public-key encryption primitive envisioned by Blaze et al. (Eurocrypt’98) and formalized by Ateniese et al. (NDSS’05) for delegating decryption rights from a delegator to a delegatee using a semi-trusted proxy. $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE notably allows to craft re-encryption keys in order to equip the proxy with the power of transforming ciphertexts under a delegator’s public key to ciphertexts under a delegatee’s public key, while not learning anything about the underlying plaintexts.We study an attractive cryptographic property for $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE, namely that of forward secrecy. In our forward-secret $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE (fs-$$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE) definition, the proxy periodically evolves the re-encryption keys and permanently erases old versions while he delegator’s public key is kept constant. As a consequence, ciphertexts for old periods are no longer re-encryptable and, in particular, cannot be decrypted anymore at the delegatee’s end. Moreover, delegators evolve their secret keys too, and, thus, not even they can decrypt old ciphertexts once their key material from past periods has been deleted. This, as we will discuss, directly has application in short-term data/message-sharing scenarios.Technically, we formalize fs-$$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE. Thereby, we identify a subtle but significant gap in the well-established security model for conventional $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE and close it with our formalization (which we dub fs-$$\mathsf {PRE} ^+$$PRE+). We present the first provably secure and efficient constructions of fs-$$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE as well as $$\mathsf {PRE}$$PRE (implied by the former) satisfying the strong fs-$$\mathsf {PRE} ^+$$PRE+ and $$\mathsf {PRE} ^+$$PRE+ notions, respectively. All our constructions are instantiable in the standard model under standard assumptions and our central building block are hierarchical identity-based encryption ($$\mathsf {HIBE}$$HIBE) schemes that only need to be selectively secure.
2017
PKC
2016
ASIACRYPT
2014
ASIACRYPT
2013
TCC
2013
CRYPTO
2012
ASIACRYPT
2011
ASIACRYPT
2010
TCC
2010
EPRINT
A Certifying Compiler for Zero-Knowledge Proofs of Knowledge Based on $\Sigma$-Protocols
Zero-knowledge proofs of knowledge (ZK-PoK) are important building blocks for numerous cryptographic applications. Although ZK-PoK have very useful properties, their real world deployment is typically hindered by their significant complexity compared to other (non-interactive) crypto primitives. Moreover, their design and implementation is time-consuming and error-prone. We contribute to overcoming these challenges as follows: We present a comprehensive specification language and a certifying compiler for ZK-PoK protocols based on $\Sigma$-protocols and composition techniques known in literature. The compiler allows the fully automatic translation of an abstract description of a proof goal into an executable implementation. Moreover, the compiler overcomes various restrictions of previous approaches, e.g., it supports the important class of exponentiation homomorphisms with hidden-order co-domain, needed for privacy-preserving applications such as idemix. Finally, our compiler is certifying, in the sense that it automatically produces a formal proof of security (soundness) of the compiled protocol (currently covering special homomorphisms) using the Isabelle/HOL theorem prover.
2008
EPRINT
Automatic Generation of Sound Zero-Knowledge Protocols
Efficient zero-knowledge proofs of knowledge (ZK-PoK) are basic building blocks of many practical cryptographic applications such as identification schemes, group signatures, and secure multiparty computation. Currently, first applications that essentially rely on ZK-POKs are being deployed in the real world. The most prominent example is Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA), which was adopted by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG) and implemented as one of the functionalities of the cryptographic chip Trusted Platform Module (TPM). Implementing systems using ZK-PoK turns out to be challenging, since ZK-PoK are, loosely speaking, significantly more complex than standard crypto primitives, such as encryption and signature schemes. As a result, implementation cycles of ZK-PoK are time-consuming and error-prone, in particular for developers with minor or no cryptographic skills. To overcome these challenges, we have designed and implemented a compiler with corresponding languages that given a high-level ZK-PoK protocol specification automatically generates a sound implementation of this. The output is given in form of $\Sigma$-protocols, which are the most efficient protocols for ZK-PoK currently known. Our compiler translates ZK-PoK protocol specifications, written in a high-level protocol description language, into Java code or \LaTeX\ documentation of the protocol. The compiler is based on a unified theoretical framework that encompasses a large number of existing ZK-PoK techniques. Within this framework we present a new efficient ZK-PoK protocol for exponentiation homomorphisms in hidden order groups. Our protocol overcomes several limitations of the existing proof techniques.