International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Alexander May

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2022
EUROCRYPT
Approximate Divisor Multiples - Factoring with Only a Third of the Secret CRT-Exponents 📺
We address Partial Key Exposure attacks on CRT-RSA on secret exponents $d_p, d_q$ with small public exponent $e$. For constant $e$ it is known that the knowledge of half of the bits of one of $d_p, d_q$ suffices to factor the RSA modulus $N$ by Coppersmith's famous {\em factoring with a hint} result. We extend this setting to non-constant $e$. Somewhat surprisingly, our attack shows that RSA with $e$ of size $N^{\frac 1 {12}}$ is most vulnerable to Partial Key Exposure, since in this case only a third of the bits of both $d_p, d_q$ suffices to factor $N$ in polynomial time, knowing either most significant bits (MSB) or least significant bits (LSB). Let $ed_p = 1 + k(p-1)$ and $ed_q = 1 + \ell(q-1)$. On the technical side, we find the factorization of $N$ in a novel two-step approach. In a first step we recover $k$ and $\ell$ in polynomial time, in the MSB case completely elementary and in the LSB case using Coppersmith's lattice-based method. We then obtain the prime factorization of $N$ by computing the root of a univariate polynomial modulo $kp$ for our known $k$. This can be seen as an extension of Howgrave-Graham's {\em approximate divisor} algorithm to the case of {\em approximate divisor multiples} for some known multiple $k$ of an unknown divisor $p$ of $N$. The point of {\em approximate divisor multiples} is that the unknown that is recoverable in polynomial time grows linearly with the size of the multiple $k$. Our resulting Partial Key Exposure attack with known MSBs is completely rigorous, whereas in the LSB case we rely on a standard Coppersmith-type heuristic. We experimentally verify our heuristic, thereby showing that in practice we reach our asymptotic bounds already using small lattice dimensions. Thus, our attack is highly practical.
2022
EUROCRYPT
McEliece needs a Break -- Solving McEliece-1284 and Quasi-Cyclic-2918 with Modern ISD 📺
With the recent shift to post-quantum algorithms it becomes increasingly important to provide precise bit-security estimates for code-based cryptography such as McEliece and quasi-cyclic schemes like BIKE and HQC. While there has been significant progress on information set decoding (ISD) algorithms within the last decade, it is still unclear to which extent this affects current cryptographic security estimates. We provide the first concrete implementations for representation-based ISD, such as May-Meurer-Thomae (MMT) or Becker-Joux-May-Meurer (BJMM), that are parameter-optimized for the McEliece and quasi-cyclic setting. Although MMT and BJMM consume more memory than naive ISD algorithms like Prange, we demonstrate that these algorithms lead to significant speedups for practical cryptanalysis already for cryptographic instances of medium security level (around 60 bit). More concretely, we provide data for the record computations of McEliece-1223 and McEliece-1284 (old record: 1161), and for the quasi-cyclic setting up to dimension 2918 (before: 1938). Based on our record computations we extrapolate to the bit-security level of the proposed BIKE, HQC and McEliece parameters in NIST's standardization process. For BIKE/HQC, we also show how to transfer the Decoding-One-Out-of-Many (DOOM) technique to MMT/BJMM. Although we achieve significant DOOM speedups, our estimates confirm the bit-security levels of BIKE and HQC. For the proposed McEliece round-3 parameter sets of 192 and 256 bit, however, our extrapolation indicates a security level overestimate by roughly 20 and 10 bits, respectively, i.e., the high-security McEliece instantiations may be a bit less secure than desired.
2022
TOSC
Quantum Period Finding is Compression Robust 📺
Alexander May Lars Schlieper
We study quantum period finding algorithms such as Simon and Shor (and its variant Ekerå-Håstad). For a periodic function f these algorithms produce – via some quantum embedding of f – a quantum superposition ∑x |x〉 |f(x)〉, which requires a certain amount of output qubits that represent |f(x)〉. We show that one can lower this amount to a single output qubit by hashing f down to a single bit in an oracle setting.Namely, we replace the embedding of f in quantum period finding circuits by oracle access to several embeddings of hashed versions of f. We show that on expectation this modification only doubles the required amount of quantum measurements, while significantly reducing the total number of qubits. For example, for Simon’s algorithm that finds periods in f : Fn2 → Fn2 our hashing technique reduces the required output qubits from n down to 1, and therefore the total amount of qubits from 2n to n + 1. We also show that Simon’s algorithm admits real world applications with only n + 1 qubits by giving a concrete realization of a hashed version of the cryptographic Even-Mansour construction. Moreover, for a variant of Simon’s algorithm on Even-Mansour that requires only classical queries to Even-Mansour we save a factor of (roughly) 4 in the qubits.Our oracle-based hashed version of the Ekerå-Håstad algorithm for factoring n-bit RSA reduces the required qubits from (3/2 + o(1))n down to (1/2+ o(1))n.
2022
CRYPTO
Partial Key Exposure Attacks on BIKE, Rainbow and NTRU 📺
In a so-called partial key exposure attack one obtains some information about the secret key, e.g. via some side-channel leakage. This information might be a certain fraction of the secret key bits (erasure model) or some erroneous version of the secret key (error model). The goal is to recover the secret key from the leaked information. There is a common belief that, as opposed to e.g. the RSA cryptosystem, most post-quantum cryptosystems are usually resistant against partial key exposure attacks. We strongly question this belief by constructing partial key exposure attacks on code-based, multivariate, and lattice-based schemes (BIKE, Rainbow and NTRU). Our attacks exploit the redundancy that modern PQ cryptosystems inherently use for efficiency reasons. The application and development of techniques from information set decoding plays a crucial role for achieving our results. On the theoretical side, we show non-trivial information leakage bounds that allow for a polynomial time key recovery attack. As an example, for all schemes the knowledge of a constant fraction of the secret key bits suffices to reconstruct the full key in polynomial time. Even if we no longer insist on polynomial time attacks, most of our attacks extend well and remain feasible up to large erasure and error rates. In the case of BIKE for example we obtain attack complexities around 60 bits when half of the secret key bits are erased, or a quarter of the secret key bits are faulty. Our results show that even highly error-prone key leakage of modern PQ cryptosystems may lead to full secret key recoveries.
2021
CRYPTO
How to Meet Ternary LWE Keys 📺
Alexander May
The LWE problem with its ring variants is today the most prominent candidate for building efficient public key cryptosystems resistant to quantum computers. NTRU-type cryptosystems use an LWE-type variant with small max-norm secrets, usually with ternary coefficients from the set $\{-1,0,1\}$. The presumably best attack on these schemes is a hybrid attack that combines lattice reduction techniques with Odlyzko's Meet-in-the-Middle approach. Odlyzko's algorithm is a classical combinatorial attack that for key space size $\S$ runs in time $\S^{0.5}$. We substantially improve on this Meet-in-the-Middle approach, using the representation technique developed for subset sum algorithms. Asymptotically, our heuristic Meet-in-the-Middle attack runs in time roughly $\S^{0.25}$, which also beats the $\S^{\frac 1 3}$ complexity of the best known quantum algorithm. For the round-3 NIST post-quantum encryptions NTRU and NTRU Prime we obtain non-asymptotic instantiations of our attack with complexity roughly $\S^{0.3}$. As opposed to other combinatorial attacks, our attack benefits from larger LWE field sizes $q$, as they are often used in modern lattice-based signatures. For example, for BLISS and GLP signatures we obtain non-asymptotic combinatorial attacks around $\S^{0.28}$. Our attacks do not invalidate the security claims of the aforementioned schemes. However, they establish improved combinatorial upper bounds for their security. We leave it is an open question whether our new Meet-in-the-Middle attack in combination with lattice reduction can be used to speed up the hybrid attack.
2021
ASIACRYPT
Partial Key Exposure Attack on Short Secret Exponent CRT-RSA 📺
Let $(N,e)$ be an RSA public key, where $N=pq$ is the product of equal bitsize primes $p,q$. Let $d_p, d_q$ be the corresponding secret CRT-RSA exponents. Using a Coppersmith-type attack, Takayasu, Lu and Peng (TLP) recently showed that one obtains the factorization of $N$ in polynomial time, provided that $d_p, d_q \leq N^{0.122}$. Building on the TLP attack, we show the first {\em Partial Key Exposure} attack on short secret exponent CRT-RSA. Namely, let $N^{0.122} \leq d_p, d_q \leq N^{0.5}$. Then we show that a constant known fraction of the least significant bits (LSBs) of both $d_p, d_q$ suffices to factor $N$ in polynomial time. Naturally, the larger $d_p,d_q$, the more LSBs are required. E.g. if $d_p, d_q$ are of size $N^{0.13}$, then we have to know roughly a $\frac 1 5$-fraction of their LSBs, whereas for $d_p, d_q$ of size $N^{0.2}$ we require already knowledge of a $\frac 2 3$-LSB fraction. Eventually, if $d_p, d_q$ are of full size $N^{0.5}$, we have to know all of their bits. Notice that as a side-product of our result we obtain a heuristic deterministic polynomial time factorization algorithm on input $(N,e,d_p,d_q)$.
2020
EUROCRYPT
Low Weight Discrete Logarithms and Subset Sum in $2^{0.65n}$ with Polynomial Memory 📺
Andre Esser Alexander May
We propose two heuristic polynomial memory collision finding algorithms for the low Hamming weight discrete logarithm problem in any abelian group $G$. The first one is a direct adaptation of the Becker-Coron-Joux (BCJ) algorithm for subset sum to the discrete logarithm setting. The second one significantly improves on this adaptation for all possible weights using a more involved application of the representation technique together with some new Markov chain analysis. In contrast to other low weight discrete logarithm algorithms, our second algorithm's time complexity interpolates to Pollard's $|G|^{\frac 1 2}$ bound for general discrete logarithm instances. We also introduce a new heuristic subset sum algorithm with polynomial memory that improves on BCJ's $2^{0.72n}$ time bound for random subset sum instances $a_1, \ldots, a_n, t \in \Z_{2^n}$. Technically, we introduce a novel nested collision finding for subset sum -- inspired by the NestedRho algorithm from Crypto '16 -- that recursively produces collisions. We first show how to instantiate our algorithm with run time $2^{0.649n}$. Using further tricks, we are then able to improve its complexity down to $2^{0.645n}$.
2018
CRYPTO
Dissection-BKW 📺
The slightly subexponential algorithm of Blum, Kalai and Wasserman (BKW) provides a basis for assessing LPN/LWE security. However, its huge memory consumption strongly limits its practical applicability, thereby preventing precise security estimates for cryptographic LPN/LWE instantiations.We provide the first time-memory trade-offs for the BKW algorithm. For instance, we show how to solve LPN in dimension k in time $$2^{\frac{4}{3} \frac{k}{\log k} }$$ and memory $$2^{\frac{2}{3} \frac{k}{\log k} }$$. Using the Dissection technique due to Dinur et al. (Crypto ’12) and a novel, slight generalization thereof, we obtain fine-grained trade-offs for any available (subexponential) memory while the running time remains subexponential.Reducing the memory consumption of BKW below its running time also allows us to propose a first quantum version QBKW for the BKW algorithm.
2017
TOSC
The Approximate k-List Problem
Leif Both Alexander May
We study a generalization of the k-list problem, also known as the Generalized Birthday problem. In the k-list problem, one starts with k lists of binary vectors and has to find a set of vectors – one from each list – that sum to the all-zero target vector. In our generalized Approximate k-list problem, one has to find a set of vectors that sum to a vector of small Hamming weight ω. Thus, we relax the condition on the target vector and allow for some error positions. This in turn helps us to significantly reduce the size of the starting lists, which determines the memory consumption, and the running time as a function of ω. For ω = 0, our algorithm achieves the original k-list run-time/memory consumption, whereas for ω = n/2 it has polynomial complexity. As in the k-list case, our Approximate k-list algorithm is defined for all k = 2m,m > 1. Surprisingly, we also find an Approximate 3-list algorithm that improves in the runtime exponent compared to its 2-list counterpart for all 0 < ω < n/2. To the best of our knowledge this is the first such improvement of some variant of the notoriously hard 3-list problem. As an application of our algorithm we compute small weight multiples of a given polynomial with more flexible degree than with Wagner’s algorithm from Crypto 2002 and with smaller time/memory consumption than with Minder and Sinclair’s algorithm from SODA 2009.
2017
PKC
2017
CRYPTO
2017
ASIACRYPT
2015
EUROCRYPT
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
ASIACRYPT
2011
ASIACRYPT
2010
PKC
2010
CRYPTO
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
PKC
2008
PKC
2008
ASIACRYPT
2007
CRYPTO
2007
JOFC
2006
ASIACRYPT
2006
PKC
2005
EUROCRYPT
2005
EUROCRYPT
2004
CRYPTO
2004
PKC
2004
PKC
2003
CRYPTO
2002
CRYPTO

Program Committees

PKC 2022
Eurocrypt 2020
Asiacrypt 2017
Asiacrypt 2016
Crypto 2016
PKC 2016
Asiacrypt 2015
Eurocrypt 2014
Crypto 2014
PKC 2013
Crypto 2012
PKC 2011
Eurocrypt 2011
Eurocrypt 2010
PKC 2008
Asiacrypt 2007
Eurocrypt 2007
Eurocrypt 2006
PKC 2006