International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Matthew Green

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2018
EUROCRYPT
2017
EUROCRYPT
2015
CHES
2014
EPRINT
2012
PKC
2011
PKC
Secure Blind Decryption
Matthew Green
2011
TCC
2010
EPRINT
Practical Adaptive Oblivious Transfer from a Simple Assumption
Matthew Green Susan Hohenberger
We present the first efficient, adaptive oblivious transfer protocol which is fully-simulatable under a simple assumption in the standard model. The sole complexity assumption required is that given (g, g^a, g^b, g^c, Q), where g generates a bilinear group of prime order p and a, b, c are selected randomly from Zp, it is hard to decide if Q = g^{abc}. In an adaptive oblivious transfer protocol, a sender with a database of messages and a receiver repeatedly interact in such a way that the receiver obtains one message per interaction of his choice (and nothing more) while the sender learns nothing about any of the choices. All prior protocols in the standard model require dynamic "q-based" assumptions, where the number of group elements in the assumption input grows with the size of the sender's database. Our construction makes an important change to the established "assisted decryption" technique for designing adaptive OT. As in prior works, the sender commits to a database of n messages by publishing an encryption of each message and a signature on each encryption. Then, each transfer phase can be executed in time /independent/ of n as the receiver blinds one of the encryptions and proves knowledge of the blinding factors and a signature on this encryption, after which the sender helps the receiver decrypt the chosen ciphertext. One of the main obstacles to designing an adaptive OT scheme from a simple assumption is realizing a suitable signature for this purpose (i.e., enabling signatures on group elements in a manner that later allows for efficient proofs.) We make the observation that a secure signature scheme is not necessary for this paradigm, provided that signatures can only be forged in certain ways. We then show how to efficiently integrate an insecure signature into a secure adaptive OT construction. We believe this construction and its underlying techniques may be of interest in designing other privacy-preserving protocols from simple complexity assumptions.
2010
EPRINT
CPA and CCA-Secure Encryption Systems that are not 2-Circular Secure
Matthew Green Susan Hohenberger
Traditional definitions of encryption guarantee security for plaintexts which can be derived by the adversary. In some settings, such as anonymous credential or disk encryption systems, one may need to reason about the security of messages potentially unknown to the adversary, such as secret keys encrypted in a self-loop or a cycle. A public-key cryptosystem is n-circular secure if it remains secure when the ciphertexts E(pk_1, sk_2), E(pk_2, sk_3), ... , E(pk_{n-1}, sk_n), E(pk_n, sk_1) are revealed, for independent key pairs. A natural question to ask is what does it take to realize circular security in the standard model? Are all CPA-secure (or CCA-secure) cryptosystems also n-circular secure for n >1? One way to resolve this question is to produce a CPA-secure (or CCA-secure) cryptosystem which is demonstrably insecure for key cycles larger than self-loops. Recently and independently, Acar, Belenkiy, Bellare and Cash provided a CPA-secure cryptosystem, under the SXDH assumption, that is not 2-circular secure. In this paper, we present a different CPA-secure counterexample (under SXDH) as well as the first CCA-secure counterexample (under SXDH and the existence of certain NIZK proof systems) for n >1. Moreover, our 2-circular attacks recover the secret keys of both parties and thus exhibit a catastrophic failure of the system whereas the attack in Acar et al. provides a test whereby the adversary can distinguish whether it is given a 2-cycle or two random ciphertexts. These negative results are an important step in answering deep questions about which attacks are prevented by commonly-used definitions and systems of encryption.
2010
EPRINT
Synchronized Aggregate Signatures: New Definitions, Constructions and Applications
An aggregate signature scheme is a digital signature scheme where anyone given n signatures on n messages from n users can aggregate all these signatures into a single short signature. Unfortunately, no ``fully non-interactive'' aggregate signature schemes are known outside of the random oracle heuristic; that is, signers must pass messages between themselves, sequentially or otherwise, to generate the signature. Interaction is too costly for some interesting applications. In this work, we consider the task of realizing aggregate signatures in the model of Gentry and Ramzan (PKC 2006) when all signers share a synchronized clock, but do not need to be aware of or interactive with one another. Each signer may issue at most one signature per time period and signatures aggregate only if they were created during the same time period. We call this synchronized aggregation. We present a practical synchronized aggregate signature scheme secure under the Computational Diffie-Hellman assumption in the standard model. Our construction is based on the stateful signatures of Hohenberger and Waters (Eurocrypt 2009). Those signatures do not aggregate since each signature includes unique randomness for a chameleon hash and those random values do not compress. To overcome this challenge, we remove the chameleon hash from their scheme and find an alternative method for moving from weak to full security that enables aggregation. We conclude by discussing applications of this construction to sensor networks and software authentication.
2009
PKC
2008
EPRINT
On the Practicality of Short Signature Batch Verification
As pervasive communication becomes a reality, where everything from vehicles to heart monitors constantly communicate with their environments, system designers are facing a cryptographic puzzle on how to authenticate messages. These scenarios require that : (1) cryptographic overhead remain short, and yet (2) many messages from many different signers be verified very quickly. Pairing-based signatures have property (1) but not (2), whereas schemes like RSA have property (2) but not (1). As a solution to this dilemma, Camenisch, Hohenberger and Pedersen showed how to batch verify two pairing-based signatures so that the total number of pairing operations was independent of the number of signatures to verify. CHP left open the task of batching privacy-friendly authentication, which is desirable in many pervasive communication scenarios. In this work, we revisit this issue from a more practical standpoint and present the following results: 1. We describe a framework, consisting of general techniques, to help scheme and system designers understand how to {\em securely} and {\em efficiently} batch the verification of pairing equations. 2. We present a detailed study of when and how our framework can be applied to existing regular, identity-based, group, ring, and aggregate signature schemes. To our knowledge, these batch verifiers for group and ring signatures are the first proposals for batching privacy-friendly authentication, answering an open problem of Camenisch et al. 3. While prior work gave mostly asymptotic efficiency comparisons, we show that our framework is practical by implementing our techniques and giving detailed performance measurements. Additionally, we discuss how to deal with invalid signatures in a batch and our empirical results show that when roughly less than 10% of signatures are invalid, batching remains more efficient that individual verification. Indeed, our results show that batch verification for short signatures is an effective, efficient approach.
2008
ASIACRYPT
2008
EPRINT
Universally Composable Adaptive Oblivious Transfer
Matthew Green Susan Hohenberger
In an oblivious transfer (OT) protocol, a Sender with messages M_1,...,M_N and a Receiver with indices s_1,...,s_k interact in such a way that at the end the Receiver obtains M_{s_1},...,M_{s_k} without learning anything about the other messages, and the Sender does not learn anything about s_1,...,s_k. In an adaptive protocol, the Receiver may obtain M_{s_{i-1}} before deciding on $s_i$. Efficient adaptive OT protocols are interesting both as a building block for secure multiparty computation and for enabling oblivious searches on medical and patent databases. Historically, adaptive OT protocols were analyzed with respect to a ``half-simulation'' definition which Naor and Pinkas showed to be flawed. In 2007, Camenisch, Neven, and shelat, and subsequent other works, demonstrated efficient adaptive protocols in the full-simulation model. These protocols, however, all use standard rewinding techniques in their proofs of security and thus are not universally composable. Recently, Peikert, Vaikuntanathan and Waters presented universally composable (UC) non-adaptive OT protocols (for the 1-out-of-2 variant). However, it is not clear how to preserve UC security while extending these protocols to the adaptive k-out-of-N setting. Further, any such attempt would seem to require O(N) computation per transfer for a database of size N. In this work, we present an efficient and UC-secure adaptive k-out-of-N OT protocol, where after an initial commitment to the database, the cost of each transfer is constant. Our construction is secure under bilinear assumptions in the standard model.
2007
ASIACRYPT
2007
EPRINT
Blind Identity-Based Encryption and Simulatable Oblivious Transfer
Matthew Green Susan Hohenberger
In an identity-based encryption (IBE) scheme, there is a {\em key extraction} protocol where a user submits an identity string to a master authority who then returns the corresponding secret key for that identity. In this work, we describe how this protocol can be performed efficiently and in a {\em blind} fashion for several known IBE schemes; that is, a user can obtain a secret key for an identity without the master authority learning anything about this identity. We formalize this notion as {\em blind IBE} and discuss the many practical applications of such a scheme. In particular, we build upon the recent work of Camenisch, Neven, and shelat in Eurocrypt 2007 to construct oblivious transfer (OT) schemes which achieve full simulatability for both sender and receiver. OT constructions with comparable efficiency prior to Camenisch et al.\ were proven secure in the weaker half-simulation model. Our OT schemes can be constructed generically from any blind IBE, and thus require only static complexity assumptions (e.g., DBDH) whereas prior comparable schemes require dynamic complexity assumptions (e.g., $q$-PDDH).
2006
EPRINT
Identity-Based Proxy Re-encryption
Matthew Green Giuseppe Ateniese
In a proxy re-encryption scheme a semi-trusted proxy converts a ciphertext for Alice into a ciphertext for Bob {\em without} seeing the underlying plaintext. A number of solutions have been proposed in the public-key setting. In this paper, we address the problem of Identity-Based proxy re-encryption, where ciphertexts are transformed from one {\it identity} to another. Our schemes are compatible with current IBE deployments and do not require any extra work from the IBE trusted-party key generator. In addition, they are non-interactive and one of them permits multiple re-encryptions. Their security is based on a standard assumption (DBDH) in the random oracle model.
2005
EPRINT
Improved Proxy Re-Encryption Schemes with Applications to Secure Distributed Storage
In 1998, Blaze, Bleumer, and Strauss (BBS) proposed an application called atomic proxy re-encryption, in which a semi-trusted proxy converts a ciphertext for Alice into a ciphertext for Bob without seeing the underlying plaintext. We predict that fast and secure re-encryption will become increasingly popular as a method for managing encrypted file systems. Although efficiently computable, the wide-spread adoption of BBS re-encryption has been hindered by considerable security risks. Following recent work of Ivan and Dodis, we present new re-encryption schemes that realize a stronger notion of security and we demonstrate the usefulness of proxy re-encryption as a method of adding access control to the SFS read-only file system. Performance measurements of our experimental file system demonstrate that proxy re-encryption can work effectively in practice.
2005
EPRINT
Correlation-Resistant Storage via Keyword-Searchable Encryption
We consider the problem of using untrusted components to build correlation-resistant survivable storage systems that protect file replica locations, while allowing nodes to continuously re-distribute files throughout the network. The principal contribution is a chosen-ciphertext secure, searchable public key encryption scheme which allows for dynamic re-encryption of ciphertexts, and provides for node-targeted searches based on keywords or other identifiers. The scheme is provably secure under the SXDH assumption which holds in certain subgroups of elliptic curves, and a closely related assumption that we introduce.

Program Committees

Crypto 2017
PKC 2015
PKC 2012