International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Pim Tuyls

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2009
EPRINT
An efficient fuzzy extractor for limited noise
B. Skoric P. Tuyls
A fuzzy extractor is a security primitive that allows for reproducible extraction of an almost uniform key from a noisy non-uniform source. We analyze a fuzzy extractor scheme that uses universal hash functions for both information reconciliation and privacy amplification. This is a useful scheme when the number of error patterns likely to occur is limited, regardless of the error probabilities. We derive a sharp bound on the uniformity of the extracted key, making use of the concatenation property of universal hash functions and a recent tight formulation of the leftover hash lemma.
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
CHES
2008
EPRINT
Privacy-Preserving Matching of DNA Profiles
In the last years, DNA sequencing techniques have advanced to the point that DNA identification and paternity testing has become almost a commodity. Due to the critical nature of DNA related data, this causes substantial privacy issues. In this paper, we introduce cryptographic privacy enhancing protocols that allow to perform the most common DNA-based identity, paternity and ancestry tests and thus implement privacy-enhanced online genealogy services or research projects. In the semi-honest attacker model, the protocols guarantee that no sensitive information about the involved DNA is exposed, and are resilient against common forms of measurement errors during DNA sequencing. The protocols are practical and efficient, both in terms of communication and computation complexity.
2008
CHES
2008
CHES
2007
CHES
2007
EPRINT
Mutual Information Analysis -- A Universal Differential Side-Channel Attack
In this paper, we develop an information theoretic differential side-channel attack. An embedded device containing a secret key is modeled as a black box with a leakage function whose output is captured by an adversary through the noisy measurement of a physical observable e.g. the power consumed by the device. We assume only that the measured values depend somehow on the leakage and thus on the word being processed by the device. Without any knowledge on the particular dependency, this fact is exploited to mount a side-channel attack. We build a distinguisher which uses the Mutual Information between the observed and the leaked values as a statistical test. The Mutual Information is maximal when the hypothetical key guessed by the attacker equals the key in the device. Our approach is confirmed by experimental results. We perform power analysis on an embedded device using our Mutual Information based distinguisher and show that the correct key is clearly distinguishable. Finally, our approach allows to compute a good estimate of the minimal number of traces required to perform a successful attack and gives an upper bound on the information leakage in a single observation.
2006
CHES
2006
EUROCRYPT
2006
EPRINT
Information-theoretic analysis of coating PUFs
Physical Uncloneable Functions (PUFs) can be used as a cost-effective means to store cryptographic key material in an uncloneable way. In coating PUFs, keys are generated from capacitance measurements of a coating containing many randomly distributed particles with different dielectric constants. We introduce a physical model of coating PUFs by simplifying the capacitance sensors to a parallel plate geometry. We estimate the amount of information that can be extracted from the coating. We show that the inherent entropy is proportional to $sqrt{n}(log n)^{3/2}$, where n is the number of particles that fit between the capacitor plates in a straight line. However, measurement noise may severely reduce the amount of information that can actually be extracted in practice. In the noisy regime the number of extractable bits is in fact a decreasing function of n. We derive an optimal value for n as a function of the noise amplitude, the PUF geometry and the dielectric constants.
2006
EPRINT
An Elliptic Curve Processor Suitable For RFID-Tags
RFID-Tags are small devices used for identification purposes in many applications nowadays. It is expected that they will enable many new applications and link the physical and the virtual world in the near future. Since the processing power of these devices is low, they are often in the line of fire when their security and privacy is concerned. It is widely believed that devices with such constrained resources can not carry out sufficient cryptographic operations to guarantee security in new applications. In this paper, we show that identification of RFID-Tags can reach high security levels. In particular, we show how secure identification protocols based on the DL problem on elliptic curves are implemented on a constrained device such as an RFID-Tag requiring between 8500 and 14000 gates, depending on the implementation characteristics. We investigate the case of elliptic curves over $F_{2^p}$ with p prime and over composite fields $F_{2^{2p}}$. The implementations in this paper make RFID-Tags suitable for anti-counterfeiting purposes even in the off-line setting.
2004
ASIACRYPT
2004
EPRINT
Capacity and Examples of Template Protecting Biometric Authentication Systems
P. Tuyls J. Goseling
In this paper, we formulate precisely the requirements for privacy protecting biometric authentication systems. The secrecy capacity $\Cs$ is investigated for the discrete and the continuous case. We present, furthermore, a general algorithm that meets the requirements and achieves $\Cs$ as well as $\Cid$ (the identification capacity). Finally, we present some practical constructions of the general algorithm and analyze their properties.
2003
EPRINT
Visual Crypto Displays Enabling Secure Communications
In this paper we describe a low-tech and user friendly solution for secure two-way communication between two parties over a network of untrusted devices. We present a solution in which displays play a central role. Our approach guarantees privacy and allows to check the authenticity of information presented on displays. Furthermore, we provide the user with a secure return channel. To this end we propose to provide every user with a small decryption display which is, for example, integrated in a credit card and requires very limited computing power. The authentication and security are based on visual cryptography which was first introduced by Naor and Shamir in 1994. We solve some practical shortcomings of traditional visual cryptography and develop protocols for two-way authentication and privacy in untrusted environments.
2002
EPRINT
A polarisation based Visual Crypto System and its Secret Sharing Schemes
In this paper, we present a new visual crypto system based on the polarisation of light and investigate the existence and structure of the associated threshold visual secret sharing schemes. It is shown that very efficient $(n,n)$ schemes exist and that $(2,n)$ schemes are equivalent to binary codes. The existence of $(k,n)$ schemes is shown in general by two explicit constructions. Finally, bounds on the physical properties as contrast and resolution are derived.
2002
EPRINT
An addition to the paper: A polarisation based visual crypto system and its secret sharing schemes
An (n,k) pair is a pair of binary nxm matrices (A,B), such that the weight of the modulo-two sum of any i rows, 1\leq i \leq k, from A or B is equal to a_i or b_i, respectively, and moreover, a_i=b_i, for 1\leq i < k, while a_k \neq b_k. In this note we first show how to construct an (n,k) Threshold Visual Secret Sharing Scheme from an (n,k) pair. Then, we explicitly construct an (n,k)-pair for all n and k with 1 \leq k <n.

Program Committees

CHES 2013
CHES 2007