International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Seokhie Hong

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
ASIACRYPT
Optimized Method for Computing Odd-Degree Isogenies on Edwards Curves
In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute arbitrary odd-degree isogenies on Edwards curves. By using the w-coordinate, we optimized the isogeny formula on Edwards curves by Moody and Shumow. We demonstrate that Edwards curves have an additional benefit when recovering the coefficient of the image curve during isogeny computation. For $$\ell $$-degree isogeny where $$\ell =2s+1$$, our isogeny formula on Edwards curves outperforms Montgomery curves when $$s \ge 2$$. To better represent the performance improvements when w-coordinate is used, we implement CSIDH using our isogeny formula. Our implementation is about 20% faster than the previous implementation. The result of our work opens the door for the usage of Edwards curves in isogeny-based cryptography, especially for CSIDH which requires higher degree isogenies.
2011
CHES
2010
EPRINT
A note on ``Improved Fast Correlation Attacks on Stream Ciphers"
In SAC'08, an improved fast correlation attack on stream ciphers was proposed. This attack is based on the fast correlation attack proposed at Crypto'00 and combined with the fast Walsh transform. However, we found that the attack results are wrong. In this paper, we correct the results of the attack algorithm by analyzing it theoretically. Also we propose a threshold of the valid bias.
2010
FSE
2010
EPRINT
Related-Key Boomerang and Rectangle Attacks
This paper introduces the related-key boomerang and the related-key rectangle attacks. These new attacks can expand the cryptanalytic toolbox, and can be applied to many block ciphers. The main advantage of these new attacks, is the ability to exploit the related-key model twice. Hence, even ciphers which were considered resistant to either boomerang or related-key differential attacks may be broken using the new techniques. In this paper we present a rigorous treatment of the related-key boomerang and the related-key rectangle distinguishers. Following this treatment, we devise optimal distinguishing algorithms using the LLR (Logarithmic Likelihood Ratio) statistics. We then analyze the success probability under reasonable independence assumptions, and verify the computation experimentally by implementing an actual attack on a 6-round variant of KASUMI. The paper ends with a demonstration of the strength of our new proposed techniques with attacks on 10-round AES-192 and the full KASUMI.
2008
FSE
2008
EPRINT
Improved Cryptanalysis of APOP-MD4 and NMAC-MD4 using New Differential Paths
In case of security analysis of hash functions, finding a good collision-inducing differential paths has been only focused on. However, it is not clear how differential paths of a hash function influence the securities of schemes based on the hash function. In this paper, we show that any differential path of a hash function can influence the securities of schemes based on the hash function. We explain this fact with the MD4 hash function. We first show that APOP-MD4 with a nonce of fixed length can be analyzed efficiently with a new differential path. Then we improve the result of the key-recovery attack on NMAC-MD4 described by Fouque {\em et al.} \cite{FoLeNg07} by combining new differential paths. Our results mean that good hash functions should have the following property : \textit{It is computationally infeasible to find differential a path of hash functions with a high probability}.
2008
EPRINT
TinyECCK: Efficient Elliptic Curve Cryptography Implementation over $GF(2^m)$ on 8-bit MICAz Mote
In this paper, we revisit a generally accepted opinion: implementing Elliptic Curve Cryptosystem (ECC) over $GF(2^m)$ on sensor motes using small word size is not appropriate because XOR multiplication over $GF(2^m)$ is not efficiently supported by current low-powered microprocessors. Although there are some implementations over $GF(2^m)$ on sensor motes, their performances are not satisfactory enough to be used for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). We have found that a field multiplication over $GF(2^m)$ are involved in a number of redundant memory accesses and its inefficiency is originated from this problem. Moreover, the field reduction process also requires many redundant memory accesses. Therefore, we propose some techniques for reducing unnecessary memory accesses. With the proposed strategies, the running time of field multiplication and reduction over $GF(2^{163})$ can be decreased by 21.1\% and 24.7\%, respectively. These savings noticeably decrease execution times spent in Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) operations (signing and verification) by around $15\% \sim 19\%$. We present TinyECCK (Tiny Elliptic Curve Cryptosystem with Koblitz curve -- a kind of TinyOS package supporting elliptic curve operations) which is the fastest ECC implementation over $GF(2^m)$ on 8-bit sensor motes using ATmega128L as far as we know. Through comparisons with existing software implementations of ECC built in C or hybrid of C and inline assembly on sensor motes, we show that TinyECCK outperforms them in terms of running time, code size and supporting services. Furthermore, we show that a field multiplication over $GF(2^m)$ can be faster than that over $GF(p)$ on 8-bit ATmega128L processor by comparing TinyECCK with TinyECC, a well-known ECC implementation over $GF(p)$. TinyECCK with sect163k1 can compute a scalar multiplication within 1.14 secs on a MICAz mote at the expense of 5,592-byte of ROM and 618-byte of RAM. Furthermore, it can also generate a signature and verify it in 1.37 and 2.32 secs with 13,748-byte of ROM and 1,004-byte of RAM.
2008
EPRINT
Indifferentiable Security Analysis of choppfMD, chopMD, a chopMDP, chopWPH, chopNI, chopEMD, chopCS, and chopESh Hash Domain Extensions
We provide simple and unified indifferentiable security analyses of choppfMD, chopMD, a chopMDP (where the permutation $P$ is to be xored with any non-zero constant.), chopWPH (the chopped version of Wide-Pipe Hash proposed in \cite{Lucks05}), chopEMD, chopNI, chopCS, chopESh hash domain extensions. Even though there are security analysis of them in the case of no-bit chopping (i.e., $s=0$), there is no unified way to give security proofs. All our proofs in this paper follow the technique introduced in \cite{BeDaPeAs08}. These proofs are simple and easy to follow.
2008
EPRINT
Linear and Differential Cryptanalysis of Reduced SMS4 Block Cipher
SMS4 is a 128-bit block cipher with a 128-bit user key and 32 rounds, which is used in WAPI, the Chinese WLAN national standard. In this paper, we present a linear attack and a differential attack on a 22-round reduced SMS4; our 22-round linear attack has a data complexity of 2^{117} known plaintexts, a memory complexity of 2^{109} bytes and a time complexity of 2^{109.86} 22-round SMS4 encryptions and 2^{120.39} arithmetic operations, while our 22-round differential attack requires 2^{118} chosen plaintexts, 2^{123} memory bytes and 2^{125.71} 22-round SMS4 encryptions. Both of our attacks are better than any previously known cryptanalytic results on SMS4 in terms of the number of attacked rounds. Furthermore, we present a boomerang and a rectangle attacks on a 18-round reduced SMS4. These results are better than previously known rectangle attacks on reduced SMS4. The methods presented to attack SMS4 can be applied to other unbalanced Feistel ciphers with incomplete diffusion.
2008
EPRINT
Various Security Analysis of a pfCM-MD Hash Domain Extension and Applications based on the Extension
We propose a new hash domain extension \textit{a prefix-free-Counter-Masking-MD (pfCM-MD)}. And, among security notions for the hash function, we focus on the indifferentiable security notion by which we can check whether the structure of a given hash function has any weakness or not. Next, we consider the security of HMAC, two new prf constructions, NIST SP 800-56A key derivation function, and the randomized hashing in NIST SP 800-106, where all of them are based on the pfCM-MD. Especially, due to the counter of the pfCM-MD, the pfCM-MD are secure against all of generic second-preimage attacks such as Kelsey-Schneier attack \cite{KeSc05} and Elena {\em et al.}' attck \cite{AnBoFoHoKeShZi08}. Our proof technique and most of notations follow those in \cite{BeDaPeAs08,Bellare06,BeCaKr96a}.
2007
FSE
2007
EPRINT
New FORK-256
The hash function FORK-256 was published at the ¯rst NIST hash workshop and FSE 2006. It consists of simple operations so that its performance is better than that of SHA-256. However, recent papers show some weaknesses of FORK-256. In this paper, we propose newly modi¯ed FORK-256 which has no microcoliisions and so is resistant against existing attacks. Furthermore, it is faster than the old one.
2007
EPRINT
Hash Function Design Principles Supporting Variable Output Lengths from One Small Function
In this paper, we introduce new hash function design principles with variable output lengths (multiple of $n$). It is based on a function or a block cipher which has output size $n$. In the random oracle model it has optimal collision resistance which requires $\Theta(2^{(t+1)n/2})$ queries to find $(t+1)n$-bit hash output collisions, where $t$ is any positive integer. Similarly, in the ideal cipher model, $\Theta(2^{(t+1)n/2})$ queries are required to find $(t+1)n$-bit hash output collisions.
2006
CHES
2006
FSE
2006
JOFC
2006
EPRINT
On the Security of HMAC and NMAC Based on HAVAL, MD4, MD5, SHA-0 and SHA-1
HMAC is a widely used message authentication code and a pseudorandom function generator based on cryptographic hash functions such as MD5 and SHA-1. It has been standardized by ANSI, IETF, ISO and NIST. HMAC is proved to be secure as long as the compression function of the underlying hash function is a pseudorandom function. In this paper we devise two new distinguishers of the structure of HMAC, called {\em differential} and {\em rectangle distinguishers}, and use them to discuss the security of HMAC based on HAVAL, MD4, MD5, SHA-0 and SHA-1. We show how to distinguish HMAC with reduced or full versions of these cryptographic hash functions from a random function or from HMAC with a random function. We also show how to use our differential distinguisher to devise a forgery attack on HMAC. Our distinguishing and forgery attacks can also be mounted on NMAC based on HAVAL, MD4, MD5, SHA-0 and SHA-1. Furthermore, we show that our differential and rectangle distinguishers can lead to second-preimage attacks on HMAC and NMAC.
2005
FSE
2004
FSE
2002
ASIACRYPT
2001
ASIACRYPT
2000
ASIACRYPT
2000
FSE

Program Committees

Asiacrypt 2019
FSE 2010 (Program chair)
FSE 2007