International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Takeshi Sugawara

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2021
TCHES
AES-LBBB: AES Mode for Lightweight and BBB-Secure Authenticated Encryption
Yusuke Naito Yu Sasaki Takeshi Sugawara
In this paper, a new lightweight authenticated encryption scheme \textsf{AES-LBBB} is proposed, which was designed to provide backward compatibility with advanced encryption standard (AES) as well as high security and low memory. The primary design goal, backward compatibility, is motivated by the fact that AES accelerators are now very common for devices in the field; we are interested in designing an efficient and highly secure mode of operation that exploits the best of those AES accelerators. The backward compatibility receives little attention in the NIST lightweight cryptography standardization process, in which only 3 out of 32 round-2 candidates are based on AES. Our mode, \textsf{LBBB}, is inspired by the design of ALE in the sense that the internal state size is a minimum $2n$ bits when using a block cipher of length $n$ bits for the key and data. Unfortunately, there is no security proof of ALE, and forgery attacks have been found on ALE. In \textsf{LBBB}, we introduce an additional feed from block cipher's output to the key state via a certain permutation $\lambda$, which enables us to prove beyond-birthday-bound (BBB) security. We then specify its AES instance, \textsf{AES-LBBB}, and evaluate its performance for (i) software implementation on a microcontroller with an AES coprocessor and (ii) hardware implementation for an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to show that \textsf{AES-LBBB} performs better than the current state-of-the-art $\textsf{Remus}$-$\textsf{N2}$ with AES-128.
2021
TCHES
AES-LBBB: AES Mode for Lightweight and BBB-Secure Authenticated Encryption
Yusuke Naito Yu Sasaki Takeshi Sugawara
In this paper, a new lightweight authenticated encryption scheme AESLBBB is proposed, which was designed to provide backward compatibility with advanced encryption standard (AES) as well as high security and low memory. The primary design goal, backward compatibility, is motivated by the fact that AES accelerators are now very common for devices in the field; we are interested in designing an efficient and highly secure mode of operation that exploits the best of those AES accelerators. The backward compatibility receives little attention in the NIST lightweight cryptography standardization process, in which only 3 out of 32 round-2 candidates are based on AES. Our mode, LBBB, is inspired by the design of ALE in the sense that the internal state size is a minimum 2n bits when using a block cipher of length n bits for the key and data. Unfortunately, there is no security proof of ALE, and forgery attacks have been found on ALE. In LBBB, we introduce an additional feed from block cipher’s output to the key state via a certain permutation λ, which enables us to prove beyond-birthday-bound (BBB) security. We then specify its AES instance, AES-LBBB, and evaluate its performance for (i) software implementation on a microcontroller with an AES coprocessor and (ii) hardware implementation for an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to show that AES-LBBB performs better than the current state-of-the-art Remus-N2 with AES-128.
2020
EUROCRYPT
Lightweight Authenticated Encryption Mode Suitable for Threshold Implementation 📺
Yusuke Naito Yu Sasaki Takeshi Sugawara
This paper proposes tweakable block cipher (TBC) based modes \textsf{PFB}\_\textsf{Plus} and \textsf{PFB}$\omega$ that are efficient in threshold implementations (TI). Let $t$ be an algebraic degree of a target function, e.g. $t=1$ (resp. $t>1$) for linear (resp. non-linear) function. The $d$-th order TI encodes the internal state into $d t + 1$ shares. Hence, the area size increases proportionally to the number of shares. This implies that TBC based modes can be smaller than block cipher (BC) based modes in TI because TBC requires $s$-bit block to ensure $s$-bit security, e.g. \textsf{PFB} and \textsf{Romulus}, while BC requires $2s$-bit block. However, even with those TBC based modes, the minimum we can reach is 3 shares of $s$-bit state with $t=2$ and the first-order TI ($d=1$). Our first design \textsf{PFB}\_\textsf{Plus} aims to break the barrier of the $3s$-bit state in TI. The block size of an underlying TBC is $s/2$ bits and the output of TBC is linearly expanded to $s$ bits. This expanded state requires only 2 shares in the first-order TI, which makes the total state size $2.5s$ bits. We also provide rigorous security proof of \textsf{PFB}\_\textsf{Plus}. Our second design \textsf{PFB}$\omega$ further increases a parameter $\omega$: a ratio of the security level $s$ to the block size of an underlying TBC. We prove security of \textsf{PFB}$\omega$ for any $\omega$ under some assumptions for an underlying TBC and for parameters used to update a state. Next, we show a concrete instantiation of \textsf{PFB}\_\textsf{Plus} for 128-bit security. It requires a TBC with 64-bit block, 128-bit key and 128-bit tweak, while no existing TBC can support it. We design a new TBC by extending \textsf{SKINNY} and provide basic security evaluation. Finally, we give hardware benchmarks of \textsf{PFB}\_\textsf{Plus} in the first-order TI to show that TI of \textsf{PFB}\_\textsf{Plus} is smaller than that of \textsf{PFB} by more than one thousand gates and is the smallest within the schemes having 128-bit security.
2020
TOSC
LM-DAE: Low Memory Deterministic Authenticated Encryption for 128-bit Security
Yusuke Naito Yu Sasaki Takeshi Sugawara
This paper proposes a new lightweight deterministic authenticated encryption (DAE) scheme providing 128-bit security. Lightweight DAE schemes are practically important because resource-restricted devices sometimes cannot afford to manage a nonce properly. For this purpose, we first design a new mode LM-DAE that has a minimal state size and uses a tweakable block cipher (TBC). The design can be implemented with low memory and is advantageous in threshold implementations (TI) as a side-channel attack countermeasure. LM-DAE further reduces the implementation cost by eliminating the inverse tweak schedule needed in the previous TBC-based DAE modes. LM-DAE is proven to be indistinguishable from an ideal DAE up to the $O(2^n)$ query complexity for the block size $n$. To achieve 128-bit security, an underlying TBC must handle a 128-bit block, 128-bit key, and 128+4-bit tweak, where the 4-bit tweak comes from the domain separation. To satisfy this requirement, we extend SKINNY-128-256 with an additional 4-bit tweak, by applying the elastic-tweak proposed by Chakraborti et al. We evaluate the hardware performances of the proposed scheme with and without TI. Our LM-DAE implementation achieves 3,717 gates, roughly 15% fewer than state-of-the-art nonce-based schemes, thanks to removing the inverse tweak schedule.
2020
TOSC
LM-DAE: Low-Memory Deterministic Authenticated Encryption for 128-bit Security
Yusuke Naito Yu Sasaki Takeshi Sugawara
This paper proposes a new lightweight deterministic authenticated encryption (DAE) scheme providing 128-bit security. Lightweight DAE schemes are practically important because resource-restricted devices sometimes cannot afford to manage a nonce properly. For this purpose, we first design a new mode LM-DAE that has a minimal state size and uses a tweakable block cipher (TBC). The design can be implemented with low memory and is advantageous in threshold implementations (TI) as a side-channel attack countermeasure. LM-DAE further reduces the implementation cost by eliminating the inverse tweak schedule needed in the previous TBC-based DAE modes. LM-DAE is proven to be indistinguishable from an ideal DAE up to the O(2n) query complexity for the block size n. To achieve 128-bit security, an underlying TBC must handle a 128-bit block, 128-bit key, and 128+4-bit tweak, where the 4-bit tweak comes from the domain separation. To satisfy this requirement, we extend SKINNY-128-256 with an additional 4-bit tweak, by applying the elastic-tweak proposed by Chakraborti et al. We evaluate the hardware performances of the proposed scheme with and without TI. Our LM-DAE implementation achieves 3,717 gates, roughly 15% fewer than state-of-the-art nonce-based schemes, thanks to removing the inverse tweak schedule.
2019
TCHES
3-Share Threshold Implementation of AES S-box without Fresh Randomness 📺
Takeshi Sugawara
Threshold implementation is studied as a countermeasure against sidechannel attack. There had been no threshold implementation for the AES and Keccak S-boxes that satisfies an important property called uniformity. In the conventional implementations, intermediate values are remasked to compensate for the lack of uniformity. The remasking consumes thousands of fresh random bits and its implementation cost is a serious concern. Daemen recently proposed a 3-share uniform threshold implementation of the Keccak S-box. This is enabled by a new technique called the changing of the guards which can be applied to any invertible functions. Subsequently, Wegener et al. proposed a 4-share threshold implementation of the AES S-box based on the changing of the guards technique. However, a 3-share threshold implementation of AES S-box remains open. The difficulty stays in 2-input multiplication, used in decomposed S-box representations, which is non-invertible because of different input and output sizes. In this study, this problem is addressed by introducing a certain generalization of the changing of the guards technique. The proposed method provides a generic way to construct a uniform sharing for a target function having different input and output sizes. The key idea is to transform a target function into an invertible one by adding additional inputs and outputs. Based on the proposed technique, the first 3-share threshold implementation of AES S-box without fresh randomness is presented. Performance evaluation and simulation-based leakage assessment of the implementation are also presented.
2019
TCHES
Lightweight Authenticated Encryption Mode of Operation for Tweakable Block Ciphers 📺
Yusuke Naito Takeshi Sugawara
The use of a small block length is a common strategy when designing lightweight (tweakable) block ciphers (TBCs), and several 64-bit primitives have been proposed. However, when such a 64-bit primitive is used for an authenticated encryption with birthday-bound security, it has only 32-bit data complexity, which is subject to practical attacks. To employ a short block length without compromising security, we propose PFB, a lightweight TBC-based authenticated encryption with associated data mode, which achieves beyond-birthday-bound security. For this purpose, we extend iCOFB, which is originally defined with a tweakable random function. Unlike iCOFB, the proposed method can be instantiated with a TBC using a fixed tweak length and can handle variable-length data. Moreover, its security bound is improved and independent of the data length; this improves the key lifetime, particularly in lightweight blocks with a small size. The proposed method also covers a broader class of feedback functions because of the generalization presented in our proof. We evaluate the concrete hardware performances of PFB, which benefits from the small block length and shows particularly good performances in threshold implementation.
2018
TCHES
SAEB: A Lightweight Blockcipher-Based AEAD Mode of Operation 📺
Lightweight cryptography in computationally constrained devices is actively studied. In contrast to advances of lightweight blockcipher in the last decade, lightweight mode of operation is seemingly not so mature, yet it has large impact in performance. Therefore, there is a great demand for lightweight mode of operation, especially that for authenticated encryption with associated data (AEAD). Among many known properties of conventional modes of operation, the following four properties are essential for constrained devices: Minimum State Size: the state size equals to a block size of a blockcipher. Inverse Free: no need for a blockcipher decryption. XOR Only: only XOR is needed in addition to a blockcipher encryption. Online: a data block is processed only once. The properties 1 and 4 contribute to small memory usage, and the properties 2 and 3 contribute to small program/circuit footprint. On top of the above properties, the fifth property regarding associated data (AD) is also important for performance: Efficient Handling of Static AD: static AD can be precomputed. We design a lightweight blockcipher-based AEAD mode of operation called SAEB: the first mode of operation that satisfies all the five properties to the best of our knowledge. Performance of SAEB is evaluated in various software and hardware platforms. The evaluation results show that SAEB outperforms conventional blockcipher-based AEAD modes of operation in various performance metrics for lightweight cryptography.
2015
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
CHES
2013
CHES
2008
CHES