International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Krystian Matusiewicz

Affiliation: Intel

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2014
EPRINT
2014
CHES
2010
EPRINT
Differential and invertibility properties of BLAKE (full version)
BLAKE is a hash function selected by NIST as one of the 14 second round candidates for the SHA-3 Competition. In this paper, we follow a bottom-up approach to exhibit properties of BLAKE and of its building blocks: based on differential properties of the internal function G, we show that a round of BLAKE is a permutation on the message space, and present an efficient inversion algorithm. For 1.5 rounds we present an algorithm that finds preimages faster than in previous attacks. Discovered properties lead us to describe large classes of impossible differentials for two rounds of BLAKE’s internal permutation, and particular impossible differentials for five and six rounds, respectively for BLAKE- 32 and BLAKE-64. Then, using a linear and rotation-free model, we describe near-collisions for four rounds of the compression function. Finally, we discuss the problem of establishing upper bounds on the probability of differential characteristics for BLAKE.
2010
EPRINT
Distinguishers for the Compression Function and Output Transformation of Hamsi-256
Hamsi is one of 14 remaining candidates in NIST's Hash Competition for the future hash standard SHA-3. Until now, little analysis has been published on its resistance to differential cryptanalysis, the main technique used to attack hash functions. We present a study of Hamsi's resistance to differential and higher-order differential cryptanalysis, with focus on the 256-bit version of Hamsi. Our main results are efficient distinguishers and near-collisions for its full (3-round) compression function, and distinguishers for its full (6-round) finalization function, indicating that Hamsi's building blocks do not behave ideally.
2010
FSE
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
CRYPTO
2009
FSE
2008
FSE
2007
FSE
2007
EPRINT
Cryptanalysis of LASH
We show that the LASH-$x$ hash function is vulnerable to attacks that trade time for memory, including collision attacks as fast as $2^{\frac{4}{11}x}$ and preimage attacks as fast as $2^{\frac47x}$. Moreover, we describe heuristic lattice based collision attacks that use small memory but require very long messages. Based upon experiments, the lattice attacks are expected to find collisions much faster than $2^{x/2}$. All of these attacks exploit the designers' choice of an all zero IV. We then consider whether LASH can be patched simply by changing the IV. In this case, we show that LASH is vulnerable to a $2^{\frac78x}$ preimage attack. We also show that LASH is trivially not a PRF when any subset of input bytes is used as a secret key. None of our attacks depend upon the particular contents of the LASH matrix -- we only assume that the distribution of elements is more or less uniform. Additionally, we show a generalized birthday attack on the final compression of LASH which requires $O\left(x2^{\frac{x}{2(1+\frac{107}{105})}}\right) \approx O(x2^{x/4})$ time and memory. Our method extends the Wagner algorithm to truncated sums, as is done in the final transform in LASH.
2006
EPRINT
Weaknesses of the FORK-256 compression function
Krystian Matusiewicz Scott Contini Josef Pieprzyk
This report presents analysis of the compression function of a recently proposed hash function, FORK-256. We exhibit some unexpected differentials existing for the step transformation and show their possible uses in collision-finding attacks on different variants of FORK-256. As a simple application of those observations we present a method of finding chosen IV collisions for a variant of FORK-256 reduced to two branches : either 1 and 2 or 3 and 4. Moreover, we present how those differentials can be used in the full FORK-256 to easily find messages with hashes differing by only a relatively small number of bits. We argue that this method allows for finding collisions in the full function with complexity not exceeding $2^{126.6}$ hash evaluations, better than birthday attack and additionally requiring only a small amount of memory.
2004
EPRINT
Finding good differential patterns for attacks on SHA-1
Krystian Matusiewicz Josef Pieprzyk
In this paper we describe a method of finding differential patterns that may be used to attack reduced versions of SHA-1. We show that the problem of finding optimal differential patterns for SHA-1 is equivalent to the problem of finding minimal weight codeword in a linear code. Finally, we present a number of patterns of different lengths suitable for finding collisions and near-collisions and discuss some bounds on minimal weights of them.