International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Markus Rückert

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2010
EPRINT
Strongly Unforgeable Signatures and Hierarchical Identity-based Signatures from Lattices without Random Oracles
Markus Rückert
We propose a variant of Peikert's lattice-based existentially unforgeable signature scheme in the standard model. Our construction offers the same efficiency as Peikert's but supports the stronger notion of strong unforgeability. Strong unforgeability demands that the adversary is unable to produce a new message-signature pair (m, s), even if he or she is allowed to see a different signature sig' for m. In particular, we provide the first treeless signature scheme that supports strong unforgeability for the post-quantum era in the standard model. Moreover, we show how to directly implement identity-based, and even hierarchical identity-based, signatures (IBS) in the same strong security model without random oracles. An additional advantage of this direct approach over the usual generic conversion of hierarchical identity-based encryption to IBS is that we can exploit the efficiency of ideal lattices without significantly harming security. We equip all constructions with strong security proofs based on mild worst-case assumptions on lattices and we also propose concrete security parameters.
2010
EPRINT
Estimating the Security of Lattice-based Cryptosystems
Markus Rückert Michael Schneider
Encryption and signature schemes based on worst-case lattice problems are promising candidates for the post-quantum era, where classic number-theoretic assumptions are rendered false. Although there have been many important results and breakthroughs in lattice cryptography, the questions of how to systematically evaluate their security in practice and how to choose secure parameters are still open. This is mainly due to the fact that most security proofs are essentially asymptotic statements. In addition, the hardness of the underlying complexity assumption is controlled by several interdependent parameters rather than just a simple bit length as in classic schemes. With our work, we close this gap by providing a handy framework that (1) distills a hardness estimate out of a given parameter set and (2) relates the complexity of practical lattice-based attacks to symmetric ``bit security'' for the first time. Our approach takes various security levels, or attacker types, into account. Moreover, we use it to predict long-term security in a similar fashion as the results that are collected on \url{www.keylength.com}. In contrast to the experiments by Gama and Nguyen (Eurocrypt 2008), our estimates are based on precisely the family of lattices that is relevant in cryptography. Our framework can be applied in two ways: Firstly, to assess the hardness of the (few) proposed parameter sets so far and secondly, to propose secure parameters in the first place. Our methodology is applicable to essentially all lattice-based schemes that are based on the learning with errors problem (LWE) or the small integer solution problem (SIS) and it allows us to compare efficiency and security across different schemes and even across different types of cryptographic primitives.
2010
ASIACRYPT
2010
EPRINT
Generic Constructions for Verifiably Encrypted Signatures without Random Oracles or NIZKs
Verifiably encrypted signature schemes (VES) allow a signer to encrypt his or her signature under the public key of a trusted third party, while maintaining public signature verifiability. With our work, we propose two generic constructions based on Merkle authentication trees that do not require non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs (NIZKs) for maintaining verifiability. Both are stateful and secure in the standard model. Furthermore, we extend the specification for VES, bringing it closer to real-world needs. We also argue that statefulness can be a feature in common business scenarios. Our constructions rely on the assumption that CPA (even slightly weaker) secure encryption, ``maskable'' CMA secure signatures, and collision resistant hash functions exist. ``Maskable'' means that a signature can be hidden in a verifiable way using a secret masking value. Unmasking the signature is hard without knowing the secret masking value. We show that our constructions can be instantiated with a broad range of efficient signature and encryption schemes, including two lattice-based primitives. Thus, VES schemes can be based on the hardness of worst-case lattice problems, making them secure against subexponential and quantum-computer attacks. Among others, we provide the first efficient pairing-free instantiation in the standard model.
2009
EPRINT
Security of Verifiably Encrypted Signatures
Markus Rückert Dominique Schröder
In a verifiably encrypted signature scheme, signers encrypt their signature under the public key of a trusted third party and prove that they did so correctly. The security properties are unforgeability and opacity. Unforgeability states that a malicious signer should not be able to forge verifiably encrypted signatures and opacity prevents extraction from an encrypted signature. This paper proposes two novel fundamental requirements for verifiably encrypted signatures, called \emph{extractability} and \emph{abuse-freeness}, and analyze its effects on the security model of Boneh et al. Extractability ensures that the trusted third party is always able to extract a valid signature from a valid verifiably encrypted signature and abuse-freeness guarantees that a malicious signer, who cooperates with the trusted party, is not able to forge a verifiably encrypted signature. We further show that both properties are not covered by the model of Boneh et al., introduced at Eurocrypt 2003.
2008
EPRINT
Efficient Quantum-immune Blind Signatures
Markus Rückert
We present the first quantum-immune blind signature scheme. Our scheme is provably secure, efficient, and round-optimal.
2008
EPRINT
Explicit hard instances of the shortest vector problem
Building upon a famous result due to Ajtai, we propose a sequence of lattice bases with growing dimension, which can be expected to be hard instances of the shortest vector problem (SVP) and which can therefore be used to benchmark lattice reduction algorithms. The SVP is the basis of security for potentially post-quantum cryptosystems. We use our sequence of lattice bases to create a challenge, which may be helpful in determining appropriate parameters for these schemes.
2008
EPRINT
Explicit hard instances of the shortest vector problem
Building upon a famous result due to Ajtai, we propose a sequence of lattice bases with growing dimension, which can be expected to be hard instances of the shortest vector problem (SVP) and which can therefore be used to benchmark lattice reduction algorithms. The SVP is the basis of security for potentially post-quantum cryptosystems. We use our sequence of lattice bases to create a challenge, which may be helpful in determining appropriate parameters for these schemes.
2008
EPRINT
Efficient Post-quantum Blind Signatures
Markus Rückert
We present the first efficient post-quantum blind signature scheme. Our scheme is provably secure in the random oracle model, unconditionally blind, and round-optimal. We propose it as a replacement for current blind signature schemes for the post-quantum era. Its basis of security is a problem related to finding short vectors in a lattice.