International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Renato Renner

Affiliation: University of Cambridge

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2016
TCC
2014
ASIACRYPT
2013
ASIACRYPT
2010
EUROCRYPT
2007
CRYPTO
2007
CRYPTO
2007
TCC
2007
EPRINT
A Tight High-Order Entropic Quantum Uncertainty Relation With Applications
We derive a new entropic quantum uncertainty relation involving min-entropy. The relation is tight and can be applied in various quantum-cryptographic settings. Protocols for quantum 1-out-of-2 Oblivious Transfer and quantum Bit Commitment are presented and the uncertainty relation is used to prove the security of these protocols in the bounded-quantum-storage model according to new strong security definitions. As another application, we consider the realistic setting of Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) against quantum-memory-bounded eavesdroppers. The uncertainty relation allows to prove the security of QKD protocols in this setting while tolerating considerably higher error rates compared to the standard model with unbounded adversaries. For instance, for the six-state protocol with one-way communication, a bit-flip error rate of up to 17% can be tolerated (compared to 13% in the standard model). Our uncertainty relation also yields a lower bound on the min-entropy key uncertainty against known-plaintext attacks when quantum ciphers are composed. Previously, the key uncertainty of these ciphers was only known with respect to Shannon entropy.
2006
EPRINT
Indistinguishability Amplification
A random system is the abstraction of the input-output behavior of any kind of discrete system, in particular cryptographic systems. Many aspects of cryptographic security analyses and proofs can be seen as the proof that a certain random system (e.g. a block cipher) is indistinguishable from an ideal system (e.g. a random permutation), for different types of distinguishers. This paper presents a new generic approach to proving upper bounds on the distinguishing advantage of a combined system, assuming upper bounds of various types on the component systems. For a general type of combination operation of systems (including the combination of functions or the cascade of permutations), we prove two amplification theorems. The first is a direct-product theorem, similar in spirit to the XOR-Lemma: The distinguishing advantage (or security) of the combination of two (possibly stateful) systems is twice the product of the individual distinguishing advantages, which is optimal. The second theorem states that the combination of systems is secure against some strong class of distinguishers, assuming only that the components are secure against some weaker class of attacks. As a corollary we obtain tight bounds on the adaptive security of the cascade and parallel composition of non-adaptively (or only random-query) secure component systems. A key technical tool of the paper is to show a tight two-way correspondence, previously only known to hold in one direction, between the distinguishing advantage of two systems and the probability of provoking an appropriately defined event on one of the systems.
2005
ASIACRYPT
2005
CRYPTO
2005
TCC
2004
EUROCRYPT
2004
TCC
2003
CRYPTO
2003
EUROCRYPT
2003
EPRINT
Indifferentiability, Impossibility Results on Reductions, and Applications to the Random Oracle Methodology
The goals of this paper are three-fold. First we introduce and motivate a generalization of the fundamental concept of the indistinguishability of two systems, called indifferentiability. This immediately leads to a generalization of the related notion of reducibility of one system to another. Second, we prove that indifferentiability is the necessary and sufficient condition on two systems S and T such that the security of any cryptosystem using T as a component is not affected when T is substituted by S. In contrast to indistinguishability, indifferentiability is applicable in settings where a possible adversary is assumed to have access to additional information about the internal state of the involved systems, for instance the public parameter selecting a member from a family of hash functions. Third, we state an easily verifiable criterion for a system U not to be reducible (according to our generalized definition) to another system V and, as an application, prove that a random oracle is not reducible to a weaker primitive, called asynchronous beacon, and also that an asynchronous beacon is not reducible to a finite-length random string. Each of these irreducibility results alone implies the main theorem of Canetti, Goldreich and Halevi stating that there exist cryptosystems that are secure in the random oracle model but for which replacing the random oracle by any implementation leads to an insecure cryptosystem.

Program Committees

Crypto 2012
Eurocrypt 2011
Asiacrypt 2010
Crypto 2009
Crypto 2008