International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Boaz Tsaban

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2018
CRYPTO
Cryptanalysis via Algebraic Spans 📺
We introduce a method for obtaining provable polynomial time solutions of problems in nonabelian algebraic cryptography. This method is widely applicable, easier to apply, and more efficient than earlier methods. After demonstrating its applicability to the major classic nonabelian protocols, we use this method to cryptanalyze the Triple Decomposition key exchange protocol, the only classic group theory based key exchange protocol that could not be cryptanalyzed by earlier methods.
2016
CRYPTO
2015
JOFC
2015
EUROCRYPT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2007
PKC
2007
JOFC
2006
EPRINT
Length-based cryptanalysis: The case of Thompson's Group
The length-based approach is a heuristic for solving randomly generated equations in groups which possess a reasonably behaved length function. We describe several improvements of the previously suggested length-based algorithms, that make them applicable to Thompson's group with significant success rates. In particular, this shows that the Shpilrain-Ushakov public key cryptosystem based on Thompson's group is insecure, and suggests that no practical public key cryptosystem based on this group can be secure.
2005
EPRINT
The conjugacy problem and related problems in lattice-ordered groups
W. Charles Holland Boaz Tsaban
We study, from a constructive computational point of view, the techniques used to solve the conjugacy problem in the "generic" lattice-ordered group Aut(R) of order automorphisms of the real line. We use these techniques in order to show that for each choice of parameters f,g in Aut(R), the equation xfx=g is effectively solvable in Aut(R).
2005
EPRINT
Fast generators for the Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol and malicious standards
Boaz Tsaban
The Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol is based on taking large powers of a generator of a prime-order cyclic group. Some generators allow faster exponentiation. We show that to a large extent, using the fast generators is as secure as using a randomly chosen generator. On the other hand, we show that if there is some case in which fast generators are less secure, then this could be used by a malicious authority to generate a standard for the Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol which has a hidden trapdoor.
2005
EPRINT
Theoretical cryptanalysis of the Klimov-Shamir number generator TF-1
Boaz Tsaban
The internal state of the Klimov-Shamir number generator TF-1 consists of four words of size w bits each, whereas its intended strength is 2^{2w}. We exploit an asymmetry in its output function to show that the internal state can be recovered after having 2^w outputs, using 2^{1.5w} operations. For w=32 the attack is practical, but for their recommended w=64 it is only of theoretical interest.
2005
EPRINT
On an authentication scheme based on the Root Problem in the braid group
Boaz Tsaban
Lal and Chaturvedi proposed two authentication schemes based on the difficulty of the Root Problem in the braid group. We point out that the first scheme is not really as secure as the Root Problem, and describe an efficient way to crack it. The attack works for any group.
2003
EPRINT
Guaranteeing the diversity of number generators
Adi Shamir Boaz Tsaban
A major problem in using iterative number generators of the form $x_i=f(x_{i-1})$ is that they can enter unexpectedly short cycles. This is hard to analyze when the generator is designed, hard to detect in real time when the generator is used, and can have devastating cryptanalytic implications. In this paper we define a measure of security, called \emph{sequence diversity}, which generalizes the notion of cycle-length for non-iterative generators. We then introduce the class of counter assisted generators, and show how to turn any iterative generator (even a bad one designed or seeded by an adversary) into a counter assisted generator with a provably high diversity, without reducing the quality of generators which are already cryptographically strong.
2003
EPRINT
Efficient linear feedback shift registers with maximal period
Boaz Tsaban Uzi Vishne
We introduce and analyze an efficient family of linear feedback shift registers (LFSR's) with maximal period. This family is word-oriented and is suitable for implementation in software, thus provides a solution to a recent challenge \cite{FSE94}. The classical theory of LFSR's is extended to provide efficient algorithms for generation of irreducible and primitive LFSR's of this new type.
2003
EPRINT
Bernoulli numbers and the probability of a birthday surprise
Boaz Tsaban
A birthday surprise is the event that, given $k$ uniformly random samples from a sample space of size $n$, at least two of them are identical. We show that Bernoulli numbers can be used to derive arbitrarily exact bounds on the probability of a birthday surprise. This result can be used in arbitrary precision calculators, and it can be applied to better understand some questions in communication security and pseudorandom number generation.
2003
EPRINT
Permutation graphs, fast forward permutations, and
Boaz Tsaban
A permutation $P\in S_N$ is a \emph{fast forward permutation} if for each $m$ the computational complexity of evaluating $P^m(x)$ is small independently of $m$ and $x$. Naor and Reingold constructed fast forward pseudorandom cycluses and involutions. By studying the evolution of permutation graphs, we prove that the number of queries needed to distinguish a random cyclus from a random permutation in $S_N$ is $\Theta(N)$ if one does not use queries of the form $P^m(x)$, but is only $\Theta(1)$ if one is allowed to make such queries. We construct fast forward permutations which are indistinguishable from random permutations even when queries of the form $P^m(x)$ are allowed. This is done by introducing an efficient method to sample the cycle structure of a random permutation, which in turn solves an open problem of Naor and Reingold.