International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Guilin Wang

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2007
PKC
2007
EPRINT
One-Round ID-Based Blind Signature Scheme without ROS Assumption
Wei Gao Xueli Wang Guilin Wang Fei Li
In this paper, we propose a new ID-based blind signature scheme based on bilinear pairings from scratch (i.e. without using existing ID-based signature schemes, and without using existing computational assumptions). First, the round complexity of our ID-based blind signature scheme is optimal. Namely, each interactive signature generation requires the requesting user and the signer to transmit only one message each. Second, the proposed scheme is provably secure against generic parallel attack without using the ROS assumption. Indeed, the security of the proposed scheme is based on a new formalized assumption called one-more bilinear Diffie-Hellman Inversion (1m-BDHI) assumption.
2007
EPRINT
Nominative Signature: Application, Security Model and Construction
Since the introduction of nominative signature in 1996, there have been only a few schemes proposed and all of them have already been found flawed. In addition, there is no formal security model defined. Even more problematic, there is no convincing application proposed. Due to these problems, the research of nominative signature has almost stalled and it is unknown if a secure nominative signature scheme can be built or there exists an application for it. In this paper, we give positive answers to these problems. First, we illustrate that nominative signature is a better tool for building user certification systems which are originally believed to be best implemented using a universal designated-verifier signature. Second, we propose a formal definition and a rigorous set of adversarial models for nominative signature. Third, we show that Chaum's undeniable signature can be transformed efficiently to a nominative signature and prove its security.
2006
EPRINT
Further Discussions on the Security of a Nominative Signature Scheme
A nominative signature scheme allows a nominator (or signer) and a nominee (or verifier) to jointly generate and publish a signature in such a way that \emph{only} the nominee can verify the signature and if necessary, \emph{only} the nominee can prove to a third party that the signature is valid. In a recent work, Huang and Wang proposed a new nominative signature scheme which, in addition to the above properties, \emph{only} allows the nominee to convert a nominative signature to a publicly verifiable one. In ACISP 2005, Susilo and Mu presented several algorithms and claimed that these algorithms can be used by the nominator to verify the validity of a published nominative signature, show to a third party that the signature is valid, and also convert the signature to a publicly verifiable one, all \emph{without} any help from the nominee. In this paper, we point out that Susilo and Mu's attacks are actually \emph{incomplete} and {\it inaccurate}. In particular, we show that there exists no efficient algorithm for a nominator to check the validity of a signature if this signature is generated by the nominator and the nominee {\it honestly} and the Decisional Diffie-Hellman Problem is hard. On the other hand, we point out that the Huang-Wang scheme is indeed {\it insecure}, since there is an attack that allows the nominator to generate valid nominative signatures alone and prove the validity of such signatures to a third party.
2006
EPRINT
Repairing a Security-Mediated Certificateless Encryption Scheme from PKC 2006
Joonsang Baek Guilin Wang
At PKC 2006, Chow, Boyd, and Nieto introduced the concept of security-mediated certificateless (SMC) cryptography. This notion can be considered as a variant of certificateless cryptography with the property of instantaneous key revocation, or a variant of mediated cryptography without full key escrow. They presented a definition of security for SMC encryption, which covers (fully-adaptive) chosen ciphertext attack with public key replacement considered as a strong but essential attack on certificateless cryptographic schemes. They proposed two SMC encryption schemes, one is a generic construction based on any public key encryption, identity-based encryption and one-time signature schemes and the other is a concrete construction based on bilinear pairings, which were shown to be secure under their security definition. In this note, we, however, present two types of attacks demonstrating that their generic construction for SMC encryption fails to meet their security requirement. We then discuss how to repair the scheme and provide a provably-secure solution.
2006
EPRINT
The Fairness of Perfect Concurrent Signatures
Guilin Wang Feng Bao Jianying Zhou
At Eurocrypt 2004, Chen, Kudla and Paterson introduced the concept of {\it concurrent signatures}, which allows two parties to produce two ambiguous signatures until an extra piece of information (called {\it keystone}) is released by the initial signer. Once the keystone is released publicly, both signatures are binding to their true signers {\it concurrently}. At ICICS 2004, Susilo, Mu and Zhang further proposed {\it perfect concurrent signatures} to strengthen the ambiguity of concurrent signatures. That is, even the both signers are known having issued one of the two ambiguous signatures, any third party is still unable to deduce who signed which signature, different from Chen et al.'s scheme. However, this paper points out that Susilo et al.'s two perfect concurrent signatures are actually {\it not} concurrent signatures. Specifically, we identify an attack that enables the initial signer to release a carefully prepared keystone that binds the matching signer's signature, but not the initial signer's. Therefore, both of their two schemes are {\it unfair} for the matching signer. Moreover, we present a simple but effective way to avoid this attack such that the improved schemes are truly perfect concurrent signatures.
2003
EPRINT
Remarks on Saeednia's Identity-based Society Oriented Signature Scheme with Anonymous Signers
Guilin Wang Bo Zhu
Recently, based on Guillou-Quisquater signature scheme, Saeednia proposed an identity-based society oriented signature scheme. However, in this note, we point out that Saeednia's scheme does not satisfy the claimed properties.
2003
EPRINT
Security Analysis of Several Group Signature Schemes
Guilin Wang
At Eurocrypt'91, Chaum and van Heyst introduced the concept of group signature. In such a scheme, each group member is allowed to sign messages on behalf of a group anonymously. However, in case of later disputes, a designated group manager can open a group signature and identify the signer. In recent years, researchers have proposed a number of new group signature schemes and improvements with different levels of security. In this paper, we present a security analysis of five group signature schemes proposed in [25,27,18,30,10]. By using the same method, we successfully identify several universally forging attacks on these schemes. In our attacks, anyone (not necessarily a group member) can forge valid group signatures on any messages such that the forged signatures cannot be opened by the group manager. We also discuss the linkability of these schemes, and further explain why and how we find the attacks.
2003
EPRINT
Security Analysis of Some Proxy Signatures
A proxy signature scheme allows an entity to delegate his/her signing capability to another entity in such a way that the latter can sign messages on behalf of the former. Such schemes have been suggested for use in a number of applications, particularly in distributed computing where delegation of rights is quite common. Followed by the first schemes introduced by Mambo, Usuda and Okamoto in 1996, a number of new schemes and improvements have been proposed. In this paper, we present a security analysis of four such schemes newly proposed in [15,16]. By successfully identifying several interesting forgery attacks, we show that all the four schemes are insecure. Consequently, the fully distributed proxy scheme in [11] is also insecure since it is based on the (insecure) LKK scheme [14,15]. In addition, we point out the reasons why the security proofs provided in [15] are invalid.
2003
EPRINT
Security Flaws in Several Group Signatures Proposed by Popescu
Guilin Wang Sihan Qing
In resent years, Popescu proposed several group signature schemes based on the Okamoto-Shiraishi assumption in [8-11], and claimed his schemes are secure. However, this paper demonstrates that all these schemes are insecure by identifying some security flaws. Exploiting these flaws, an attacker without any secret can mount universally forging attacks. That is, anybody (not necessarily a group member) can forge valid group signatures on arbitrary messages of his/her choice.
2003
EPRINT
On the Security of a Group Signature Scheme with Forward Security
Guilin Wang
A group signature scheme allows a group member of a given group to sign messages on behalf of the group in an anonymous and unlinkable way. In case of a dispute, however, a designated group manager can reveal the signer of a valid group signature. Based on Song's forward-secure group signature schemes, Zhang, Wu, and Wang proposed a new group signature scheme with forward security at ICICS 2003. Their scheme is very efficient in both communication and computation aspects. Unfortunately, their scheme is insecure. In this paper we present a security analysis to show that their scheme is linkable, untraceable, and forgeable.
2003
EPRINT
An Attack on Not-interactive Designated Verifier Proofs for Undeniable Signatures
Guilin Wang
At Crypto'89, Chaum and van Antwerpen first introduced the concept of undeniable signatures, which has a special property such that a signature cannot be verified without the signer's cooperation. In 1996, Jakobsson, Sako, and Impagliazzo proposed a not-interactive undeniable signature scheme by employing a new primitive called designated verifier proofs. However, this paper shows that their scheme is insecure by demonstrating a simple attack that allows a dishonest signer to convince a designated verifier receiving invalid signatures. In addition, two intuitive countermeasures are presented.
2002
EPRINT
Cryptanalysis of the Lee-Hwang Group-Oriented Undeniable Signature Schemes
Undeniable signature is an intriguing concept introduced by Chaum and Antwerpen at Crypto'89. In 1999, Lee and Hwang presented two group-oriented undeniable signature schemes with a trusted center. Their schemes are natural generalizations of Chaum's zero-knowledge undeniable signature scheme proposed in 1990. However, we find that the Lee-Hwang schemes are insecure. In this paper, we demonstrate five attacks on their schemes: four of them are universal forgery, in which one dishonest member (maybe collude with a verifier) can get a valid signature on any chosen massage, and another attack allows a dishonest member to prevent honest members from generating valid signatures but his cheating behavior is undetected. We also suggest heuristic improvements to overcome some of the problems involved in these attacks.