International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Claude Castelluccia

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2015
EPRINT
2006
EPRINT
Authenticated Interleaved Encryption \\
Claude Castelluccia
We present AIE (Authenticated Interleaved Encryption), a new scheme that allows nodes of a network to exchange messages securely (i.e. encrypted and authenticated) without sharing a common key or using public key cryptography. Our scheme is well adapted to networks, such as ad hoc, overlay or sensor networks, where nodes have limited capabilities and can share only a small number of symmetric keys. It provides privacy and integrity. An eavesdropper listening to a communication is unable to decrypt it and modify it without being detected. We show that our proposal can be used in wireless sensor networks to send encrypted packets to very dynamic sets of nodes without having to establish and maintain group keys. These sets of nodes can be explicitly specified by the source or can be specified by the network according to some criteria, such as their location, proximity to an object, temperature range. As a result, a node can, for example, send encrypted data to all the nodes within a given geographical area, without having to identify the destination nodes in advance. Finally we show that our proposal can be used to implement a secure and scalable aggregation scheme for wireless sensor networks.
2004
ASIACRYPT
2004
EPRINT
Secret Handshakes from CA-Oblivious Encryption
Claude Castelluccia Stanislaw Jarecki Gene Tsudik
Secret handshake protocols were recently introduced by Balfanz et al. [IEEE, Oakland 2003] to allow members of the same group to authenticate each other *secretly*, in the sense that someone who is not a group member cannot tell, by engaging some party in the handshake protocol, whether that party is a member of the group. On the other hand, any two parties who are members of the same group will recognize each other as members. Thus, secret handshakes can be used in any scenario where group members need to identify each other without revealing their group affiliations to outsiders. The secret handshake protocol of Balfanz et al. relies on a Bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption (in ROM) on certain elliptic curves. We show how to build secret handshake protocols secure under more standard cryptographic assumption of Computational Diffie Hellman(CDH), using a novel tool of CA-oblivious public key encryption, which is an encryption scheme s.t. neither the public key nor the ciphertext reveal any information about the Certification Authority (CA) which certified the public key. We construct such CA-oblivious encryption, and hence a handshake scheme, based on CDH (in ROM). The new scheme takes 3 communication rounds like the scheme of Balfanz et al., but it is about twice cheaper computationally, and it relies on a weaker computational assumption.
2002
EPRINT
How to convert any ID-based Signature Schemes
Claude Castelluccia
This paper describes how any Identity Based Signature schemes can be used to implement a Group Signature scheme. The performance of the generated Group Signature scheme is similar to the performance of the underlying ID-based Signature scheme. This makes our proposal very attractive since most of existing group signature schemes that have been proposed so far are grossly inefficient. In contrast, ID-based signature schemes can be very efficient especially if they use elliptic curves and pairing.