International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Tom Kevenaar

Affiliation: Philips Research

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2006
EPRINT
Information-theoretic analysis of coating PUFs
Physical Uncloneable Functions (PUFs) can be used as a cost-effective means to store cryptographic key material in an uncloneable way. In coating PUFs, keys are generated from capacitance measurements of a coating containing many randomly distributed particles with different dielectric constants. We introduce a physical model of coating PUFs by simplifying the capacitance sensors to a parallel plate geometry. We estimate the amount of information that can be extracted from the coating. We show that the inherent entropy is proportional to $sqrt{n}(log n)^{3/2}$, where n is the number of particles that fit between the capacitor plates in a straight line. However, measurement noise may severely reduce the amount of information that can actually be extracted in practice. In the noisy regime the number of extractable bits is in fact a decreasing function of n. We derive an optimal value for n as a function of the noise amplitude, the PUF geometry and the dielectric constants.
2003
EPRINT
Visual Crypto Displays Enabling Secure Communications
In this paper we describe a low-tech and user friendly solution for secure two-way communication between two parties over a network of untrusted devices. We present a solution in which displays play a central role. Our approach guarantees privacy and allows to check the authenticity of information presented on displays. Furthermore, we provide the user with a secure return channel. To this end we propose to provide every user with a small decryption display which is, for example, integrated in a credit card and requires very limited computing power. The authentication and security are based on visual cryptography which was first introduced by Naor and Shamir in 1994. We solve some practical shortcomings of traditional visual cryptography and develop protocols for two-way authentication and privacy in untrusted environments.